August 30, 2020

10 KETTLEBELL EXERCISES FOR A TOTAL BODY BURN and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on 10 KETTLEBELL EXERCISES FOR A TOTAL BODY BURN, Please, I Beg of You, Stop Asking Your Fitness Instructor for Nutrition Advice, THE BEST INNER-THIGH EXERCISES FOR WOMEN. and Study Shows Keto Hurts Endurance Athletes’ Performance
 – Diet Doctor. Hope you enjoy them…

10 KETTLEBELL EXERCISES FOR A TOTAL BODY BURN

Ever wondered what will happen if you incorporate a series of kettlebell exercises into your workout routine once or twice a week? For starters, you will increase the intensity of your workout and speed up fat loss, then you’ll improve your functional fitness which, eventually, will make you handle everyday movements (such as carrying groceries, sitting […]


Ever wondered what will happen if you incorporate a series of kettlebell exercises into your workout routine once or twice a week?

For starters, you will increase the intensity of your workout and speed up fat loss, then you’ll improve your functional fitness which, eventually, will make you handle everyday movements (such as carrying groceries, sitting down and standing up, or hauling heavy luggage like) a PRO.



Kettlebell moves integrate the use of a momentum, which requires a greater engagement of both your large and small muscle groups by performing fast-paced, compound movements that will challenge both your muscles and your cardiovascular system so you can burn fat and build muscle at the same time.

Depending of what exactly you want to achieve: If your aim is to build strength and muscle, focus on using heavier weights and complete three sets of 8 to 12 reps for each exercise. If your goal is more targeted toward fat burn, use a lighter weight that will allow you to complete 10 to 20 reps at a faster pace.

1. Renegade Kettlebell Row

Kettlebell Renegade Row | Kettlebell, Renegade rows, Toning workouts

This exercise focuses on your upper back muscles, biceps and abs all at the same time.

  • You start this exercise with a kettlebell in each hand, being in high plank position.
  • Try to keep your core tight and your spine neutral as you lift a kettlebell off the floor and row your right arm back.
  • Then return your right arm to the floor and repeat the movement with your left arm.

2. Single Leg Kettlebell Deadlift

Single Leg Kettlebell Deadlift - that's coach Allison's favorite ...

This exercise focuses on building strength in your hamstrings, glutes and core while also challenging your balance and stability.

  • You start by standing with your feet about hip-width distance apart.
  • Then while holding the kettlebell in your right hand, lift your left leg off the ground slightly.
  • Keep your core tight and your spine in neutral position as you hinge forward at your hips, letting the kettlebell fall towards the floor and your left leg extend up and back.
  • Slowly return to the starting position and repeat for the desired number of reps before switching to the other side.


3. Overhead Press + Squat

Squat to Overhead Press | A Total-Body Workout With Just 6 Moves ...

This exercise works your lower body while targeting the triceps muscles in your arms as well as your shoulders.

  • Start by holding the kettlebell with both hands over your head.
  • As you squat down flex your elbows to lower the kettlebell down behind your head, making sure to keep your elbows close to your head.
  • Then slowly return to a standing position while simultaneously re-extending your arms over your head.

4. Seated  Twist

9 Moves To Shrink Your Muffin Top | Skinny mom, Kettlebell workout ...

This particular exercise will strengthen your core, specifically your obliques, and by adding the overhead press to this move it targets your shoulders, too.

  • Start in a seated position with your knees slightly bent and the kettlebell in your hands.
  • Your torso should lean back slightly so that your core is engaged and tight as you touch the kettlebell down to the floor on your left and then twist to the right as you raise it up above your head until your arms are stretched above you completely.
  • Then lower the kettlebell back to the floor on your left by reversing the twist.
  • Repeat the desired number of reps, and then switch to the other side

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10 KETTLEBELL EXERCISES FOR A TOTAL BODY BURN was originally published at LINK






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Please, I Beg of You, Stop Asking Your Fitness Instructor for Nutrition Advice

If there is one thing that I am most often asked by clients in my classes, direct messages on Instagram, or by friends and family who know what I do, it’s almost always some form of, “What should I eat?” Sometimes, it’s “What diet should I follow?” or “What do you think about the __ […]

If there is one thing that I am most often asked by clients in my classes, direct messages on Instagram, or by friends and family who know what I do, it’s almost always some form of, “What should I eat?” Sometimes, it’s “What diet should I follow?” or “What do you think about the __ diet?” My go-to response is to duck and dodge the questions entirely. I’m kidding. Well, kind of kidding.

I’ve been a group fitness instructor for 23 years, a yoga instructor for 8 years, and I went to 7.5 years of graduate school to get two masters degrees and a Ph.D. in public health. But if you ask me for nutrition advice, I won’t give it to you. (And you’ll never find me giving it unsolicited, either.) Sounds mean, right? It’s not, I promise. In fact, it’s quite the opposite: It’s the responsible thing to do.

Here’s why most fitness professionals shouldn’t be giving you nutrition advice.

Simply put, I’m just not qualified to give nutrition advice. Period. I may have decades of experience in fitness, have studied nutrition as it pertains to public health throughout all of my graduate programs, and have personally dealt with my fair share of nutritional issues, but I am not qualified to advise you on your personal, individual dietary needs. As group fitness instructors/trainers, part of our certification courses usually include basics about nutrition, and the exams contain questions about how to advise a client. The answers are always some form of: Direct people to the USDA dietary guidelines or encourage them to seek a registered dietitian (R.D.) who can help them.

Registered dietitians go through very specific schooling, including an experiential component (like internships), have to pass a test and get licensed, and also take continuing education to stay certified. I did not dedicate years to learning how to test, diagnose, and treat nutritional imbalances the way they have, and I certainly have not been assessed on my ability to properly execute any of the above. This is not my lane.

To be clear, I am not saying there are absolutely no trainers or fitness instructors out there who are qualified in this realm. Of course there are and they are gems. But just because someone is a great trainer or strength coach doesn’t automatically mean they are qualified to give nutritional advice. (And vice versa!)

Also, I don’t know your body. Even if I were qualified to read them, I have not seen your diagnostic tests of any sort—blood, stool, or urine—to be able to understand what is happening inside your body. There’s just no way that I (or the vast majority of other fitness professionals) could consult you on your dietary needs based solely on your performance in class or on your Instagram feed.

There are a myriad of issues that can be going on in your body that warrant specific attention and a corresponding protocol. I would be very wary of anyone advising you on anything without at least a solid understanding of what is going on systematically with your body. Your body has different needs than my body, than her body, than his body, than any other body. Just because I recently read a new headline that popped into my feed or a new article that was published on the supposed benefits of a certain type of diet, does not mean it is safe or effective for you. I cannot assume it will be and, to be honest, neither should you.

If it’s nutrition advice you’re after, here are a few things to remember.

While there are a few universal nutrition truths out there (like that limiting added sugar intake is generally a good idea, and that eating mostly whole foods is great if you can swing it), most of the time when people are asking for nutrition advice, they’re wondering if there’s something specific they should be eating or avoiding. And, in most cases, that kind of advice is highly individual and based on factors that only your health care provider or registered dietitian would know about. Still, I understand that we all have questions about the foods we eat and all the conflicting nutrition headlines we see every day. So, here are a few general rules to keep in mind:



Please, I Beg of You, Stop Asking Your Fitness Instructor for Nutrition Advice was originally published at LINK







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THE BEST INNER-THIGH EXERCISES FOR WOMEN.

LATERAL BAND WALKS This exercise targets the hip adductors. Focus on moving slowly through each step rather than using momentum to swing your legs from side to side, Kotek says. Start in a quarter-squat position (a shallower squat) with a mini looped resistance band just above your knees. Take a giant step to your right […]


LATERAL BAND WALKS

This exercise targets the hip adductors. Focus on moving slowly through each step rather than using momentum to swing your legs from side to side, Kotek says.

  • Start in a quarter-squat position (a shallower squat) with a mini looped resistance band just above your knees.
  • Take a giant step to your right with your right foot, then follow with your left.
  • Step back with your left, and then your right, to return to starting position.
  • Repeat the movement but this time, begin with the left foot. That’s one rep.
  • Continue this movement, alternating directions each time.

MONSTER WALKS

Similar to (but just different enough from!) lateral band walks, this variation trains the glute medius from a different angle while also training the hip flexors and extensors in the front and back of your hips, respectively, Kotek says.

  • Stand with your feet hip-width apart, a mini looped resistance band just above your knees, and your knees slightly bent. (Don’t lock them out.)
  • Take a giant diagonal step forward and to the right with your right foot, then follow with your left, ending with your feet together.
  • To return to starting position, reverse the movement, stepping diagonally behind your body with each step.
  • Take another diagonal step forward, this time leading with the left foot instead and following with your right.
  • Reverse the movement to return to starting position. That’s one rep.
    Repeat this movement, alternating directions each time.

SIDE PLANKS WITH LEG ABDUCTION

Strengthening the core and glute medius muscles will help limit your body’s side-to-side motion when running, Kotek says.

  • Start in a side-plank position with your feet stacked, balanced on your lower foot and forearm. Loop the resistance band just above your knees.
  • Squeeze your glutes to lift your top leg toward the ceiling as high as possible while keeping the rest of your body in a straight line from head to heels.
  • Pause, then slowly lower the top leg to return to start. That’s one rep.
  • Repeat all reps, then perform on the opposite side.

MINI-BAND GLUTE BRIDGES

This variation on the master glute-strengthening move, the glute bridge, hones in on hip stability and improves the ability to drive through the ground and power each stride.

  • Lie face up with your back flat on the floor, a mini looped resistance band just above your knees, and your feet flat on the floor, spread hip-width apart.
  • Push through your heels and squeeze your glutes to raise your hips until your body forms a straight line from shoulders to knees.
  • Pause, then slowly lower your hips to return to start. That’s one rep.

MINI-BAND SQUATS

“Nothing beats a properly performed squat, which has fantastic activation of both the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius—as long as it is performed correctly,” Kalika says. Using a looped resistance band can help you maintain proper form and muscle engagement. With each rep, work to keep your knees from caving in toward each other.

  • Stand with your feet hip-width apart and a mini looped resistance band just above your knees.
  • Push your hips back and bend your knees to lower down as far as possible into a squat without letting your knees fall in toward each other.
  • Pause, then drive through your heels to return to starting position. That’s one rep.

SINGLE-LEG SQUATS

Kalika says that being able to do single-leg squats without dropping the knee, hiking the pelvis, or rotating away is a great goal for all runners. After all, running is pretty much just performing alternating single-leg squats for miles at a time.

  • Stand tall with your back facing a flat bench, and lift one foot a few inches in front of you.
  • Push your hips back and bend your knees to lower down as far as possible into a single-leg squat. Once you master lowering to touch your glutes to the bench without relaxing onto it, lower the bench or try lowering to the floor.
  • Pause, then push through your planted heel to return to start. That’s one rep.
  • Perform all reps, then repeat on the opposite side.

Source : www.self.com



THE BEST INNER-THIGH EXERCISES FOR WOMEN. was originally published at LINK







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Study Shows Keto Hurts Endurance Athletes’ Performance
 – Diet Doctor

A new study shows keto athletes burn more fat — but get slower — when compared to those who eat a high-carb diet. This leads us to inquire whether cutting out carbs actually hurts or helps competitive endurance athletes. And, perhaps, more importantly, what does it mean for us “mere mortals” who aren’t sports professionals? This is […]

View of runners legs training outdoor – Young couple doing a workout session on stairs next the beach at sunset – Healthy people, jogging and sport lifestyle concept

A new study shows keto athletes burn more fat — but get slower — when compared to those who eat a high-carb diet.

This leads us to inquire whether cutting out carbs actually hurts or helps competitive endurance athletes. And, perhaps, more importantly, what does it mean for us “mere mortals” who aren’t sports professionals?

This is a question that has been batted around for years, especially as we see examples of low-carb athletes like Zach Bitter breaking endurance world records or cycling phenom Chris Froome winning the Tour de France while reportedly eating a ketogenic diet.

Even while we have evidence of athletes who have excelled while restricting carbs, there is some scientific evidence that seems to suggest that keto diets are harmful — not helpful — for competitive athletic performance.

Louise Burke, an Australian sports dietitian, published a study in The Journal of Physiology back in 2016, which showed how eating a keto diet dramatically improved race walkers’ ability to burn fat for fuel.

Burke’s study fits well with another recent study, which shows how muscle adapts much better to burning fat when on a low-carb diet. This study also shows how muscles can actually maintain this fat-burning ability — even after shifting back to a higher-carb diet.

However, Burke and her colleagues also found that this increase in fat oxidation actually hindered the body’s ability to efficiently utilize energy. As a result, race times eventually began to suffer for those who were restricting carbs when compared to those who ate a higher-carb diet.

Burke’s study was met with significant pushback about the trial design. Criticisms of Burke’s process include having too short of an adaptation period and not using a meaningful performance measure, among other issues.

In response to these criticisms, Burke and her colleagues performed a replication study, which addressed some, although not all, of the concerns. This was published in PLOS ONE, a peer-reviewed open access scientific journal.

The results of the second trial matched the first. The race walkers who ate a low-carb keto diet improved their fat oxidation but decreased their 10k and 20k race times.

The high-carb athletes improved by 134 seconds, and the low-carb athletes slowed by 61 seconds. And so, the authors concluded that very low-carbohydrate diets are harmful for endurance athletic performance.

On the surface, this seems very reliable. Based on this study, if you are an endurance race walker considering a keto diet, it may not be the best choice for your performance.

But, what about those who are chronically in ketosis? Drs. Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek have mentioned that it may take up to six months for an athlete to fully adapt to keto performance.

However, it’s important to note their conclusions appear to be based more on clinical experience than scientific studies.

Since we don’t have strong evidence that chronic ketosis provides a competitive advantage, some, like Alex Hutchinson, an award-winning journalist, claims that we should default to the position that a keto diet is harmful to performance. The burden of proof, he says, is on those who claim otherwise.

From a scientific perspective, Hutchinson has a great point. But, here is my question: Does this matter for most of us? Is this evidence having to do with competitive race times worth applying to the life of the everyday person striving for better health?

If you are an elite athlete competing professionally, then 61 seconds could be considered an eternity. In this case, it would be wise to make sure you’re following the latest science so that you can maximize your competitive edge.

But, if you are someone who’s interested in optimizing your health, burning fat for fuel, and experiencing the benefits of a low-carb lifestyle, then it’s likely the case that you can afford that 61-second loss.

For me, it’s worth it. Which category are you in?

Thanks for reading,
Bret Scher, MD FACC

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Study Shows Keto Hurts Endurance Athletes’ Performance
 – Diet Doctor was originally published at LINK