July 14, 2020

9 Simple Tools For a Stronger Body Image and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on 9 Simple Tools For a Stronger Body Image, Why Can’t I Gain Weight ? A Few Guidelines On How To Gain Muscle Mass – Fitness and Power, 20 Year Old Belgian Fitness Sensation Savannah Prez and These standing dynamic stretches make warming up easier than ever. Hope you enjoy them…

9 Simple Tools For a Stronger Body Image

Experts, athletes, coaches, and parents agree that raising young female athletes requires careful navigation through many challenges, especially during and after puberty. We’re only starting to understand what it takes to help them flourish. Partly, perhaps, because we’re only starting to understand what it takes to help ourselves truly flourish. In this five-part investigative report,…

Experts, athletes, coaches, and parents agree that raising young female athletes requires careful navigation through many challenges, especially during and after puberty. We’re only starting to understand what it takes to help them flourish. Partly, perhaps, because we’re only starting to understand what it takes to help ourselves truly flourish.

In this five-part investigative report, we examine both how to #FixGirlsSports and raise a stronger, healthier next generation; as well as how to re-evaluate our own body image for the better, including the resources you need to rebuild or fortify one of the most important relationships of all—the one with yourself.

Motivated to improve your body image? First, know that negative thoughts aren’t your fault, and you’re far from alone in struggling with them. But also know that changing your body doesn’t solve the problem—women of all shapes and sizes can have a healthy body image or a poor one. Instead, work to alter your mindset by developing three key skills: mindfulness (staying in the moment), self-compassion (treating yourself kindly rather than harshly judging), and body attunement (getting in touch with the signals your body sends).

The following nine techniques can help you hone these mindsets to improve your body image. Experts are still learning exactly how to shape body image for the better—so be creative about what makes you personally feel good. Eventually, you can build a toolkit to reduce the occurrence of negative thoughts and minimize the impact when they do occur, says Marci Evans, R.D.

Inventory

Examine the people—and messages—you’re surrounding yourself with. Phase out any that make you feel ashamed or inadequate. Intentionally seek out athletes of different sizes to follow and befriend in real life.

Thank

Try a daily gratitude, like sport psychologist Leeja Carter’s practice of touching various joints and organs and thanking them for the work they do. In addition, place random reminders in your phone that ping you with a message about the strength of your legs or the power of your core.

Correspond

Write a letter from your head to your body, either in a functional approach (listing all your body helps you do each day) or a compassionate one (from the perspective of a loving friend). Just 15 minutes of either tactic boosts body satisfaction and improves body image, according to researchers.

Defuse

Track your avoidance behavior—situations you steer clear of because of body fears. Place them in a hierarchy, from slightly intimidating to completely overwhelming. Then, expose yourself to them in small doses or on a short-term basis. For instance, spend five minutes bathing-suit shopping, or tell yourself you’ll accept all dinner invitations for a month. Soon, they’ll seem less scary, says Kara Bazzi, a therapist and cofounder of Opal Food & Body Wisdom in Seattle.

Visualize

Pick a quiet time and practice imagining yourself accomplishing goals in the body you have. Both internal and external imagery can work, Carter says: picturing the scene of crossing a finish line, or tapping into the mental and physical sensations of finishing a tough workout strong.

Catalogue

Everyone has moments when they feel strong and powerful. When those occur, pause for a moment and write them on a slip of paper. Put them in a box, and pull one out whenever you have a low moment, says certified mental performance consultant Angie Fifer.

Recalibrate

Another way to handle negative thoughts: Pause and ask where the thought came from. Notice how it makes you feel. Then let it pass, bringing yourself back to the moment by focusing on your breath or using a physical cue, such as relaxing your shoulders and arms.

Connect

Body-shaming, or “fat talk,” runs rampant. Resist the urge to respond either by bashing yourself or flattering the speaker (“I wish my stomach was as flat as yours!”). Instead, wait until a neutral time and start a dialogue about how those conversations make you feel. Try: “I’m wondering if, as friends and as women, we can find a different way to talk about our bodies so it isn’t this shared hating ground.”

Rebel

Rise up in rage at the culture, coaches, and others who place harmful and inappropriate demands on our bodies. Instead of worrying about whether your body conforms to an ideal, become a new example for improved body image everywhere. That makes you the one in control, instead of the environment telling you what we can be, which is far more empowering.

Read On

This is How You Raise Healthy Female Athletes

How Coaches and Parents Can Keep Girls Running

What is Healthy Body Image, Anyways?

6 Factors That Can Affect Your Body Image



9 Simple Tools For a Stronger Body Image was originally published at http://ow.ly/SusQ50Azy1b






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Why Can’t I Gain Weight ? A Few Guidelines On How To Gain Muscle Mass – Fitness and Power

Most people struggle with excess weight and find the process of losing weight slow and difficult. But there are people that are the complete opposite of that. Many trainees try hard to gain muscle mass, but they keep struggling without results. This article targets people who have hard time building muscle and gaining weight. Yes,…

Most people struggle with excess weight and find the process of losing weight slow and difficult. But there are people that are the complete opposite of that. Many trainees try hard to gain muscle mass, but they keep struggling without results.


This article targets people who have hard time building muscle and gaining weight. Yes, there are such people too. The problem can be summed up in just a few words: They don’t eat enough. And they don’t keep track of the food. It is impossible to keep track of the food (on paper) and wonder why the arrow on the scale doesn’t move.

The article is intended for people who either cannot handle the needed amount of calories, or simply do not follow the plan and don’t eat enough.

There are basically two approaches to solving this problem. Eating higher amount of calories or limiting your energy expenditure so you can get in calorie surplus.

On Paper

If you eat less or equal amount of calories as your daily basal calorie needs , it is absolutely impossible to gain weight. And it doesn’t matter whether your diet consists of meat and broccoli or waffles and sweets.

Why is it so hard to gain muscle?

1. The body has its own mechanisms for self-regulation of weight. It tends to stay at approximately the same weight . If at lunch time you eat a lot of calories, then your body will make sure you lose your appetite for a long time after lunch.

Everyone has a friend who has hard time gaining some muscle. They usually will explain how much they ate lunch. But if you ask them that same day how did they finish the day, I’m sure you’ll get the answer: “Well … I was not very hungry and I ate a small meal for dinner ” or “I ate just a salad”. Bottom line is that the one big meal they ate doesn’t mean that the food they ate the whole day was a lot.


The same thing can be observed in the long term. Come the holidays and even the skinny people begin to overeat. But that only lasts for two to three days. Those few days are usually followed by a sharp decline in appetite and the caloric intake decreased over the next week. Eventually you are back where you started in the first place.

2. Another problem is that the definition of “lots of food” has a different meaning depending on the person in question. Many skinny people believe they are eating large amounts of food, which is far from reality. The same can be said for overweight people who can swear they “eat almost nothing” and still can’t lose weight. If you really want to gain muscle or lose fat, it’s time to start tracking your calorie and macronutrient intake seriously.

Rarely, the problem can be a hormonal disbalance or an illness. Hypersensitivity to leptin and insulin can cause a chronic lack of appetite.

3. The third issue is the phenomenon of short term correspondence between the increased food consumption and the increase in unintended physical activity. When a skinny person overeats repeatedly, you may notice how their physical activity increases unconsciously. They become very energetic, nervous and usually desire to do some sort of physical activity. You can observe the totally opposite case in a person on a diet who limits their calories. They usually become lazy and unwilling to do any sort of physical activity (think of bodybuilders before a competition).

4. Evolutionary adaptation. From a survival point of view, carrying big muscle mass like today’s bodybuilders do is a bad idea. More muscle means you need more calories to sustain that muscle mass, and you are not as agile and fast as a human with less muscle mass is.

In reality (Continues on next page…)




Why Can’t I Gain Weight ? A Few Guidelines On How To Gain Muscle Mass – Fitness and Power was originally published at https://www.fitnessandpower.com/nutrition/how-to-gain-muscle-mass







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20 Year Old Belgian Fitness Sensation Savannah Prez

Quick Stats: Age: 20Height: 5’2” – 160 cmWeight: 130 lbs – 59 kg Where does your motivation come from? What motivates me the most is seeing the results from all of my hard work, and I’m always looking for new ways to test myself and stretch my limits. The second thing that really motivates me…

Quick Stats:

Age: 20
Height: 5’2” – 160 cm
Weight: 130 lbs – 59 kg

How did you get started with bodybuilding?

I’ve always been passionate about pushing my body and my limits. Before I started working out, I used to play basketball. After ten years of basketball, I wanted to do something entirely different, but I had trouble committing to a scheduled training roster, that’s when I decided to try out a sport that I could do on my terms. When I first got into fitness it was recreational; I only worked out maybe twice a week.

After six months of training, I decided to raise the bar, and I got in touch with a coach to help me with my diet.

Where does your motivation come from?

What motivates me the most is seeing the results from all of my hard work, and I’m always looking for new ways to test myself and stretch my limits. The second thing that really motivates me is the daily support that I receive through my social media platforms, especially on Instagram. I’m very thankful for all of the support that I receive from everyone, and I never take it for granted. I try my very best to post interesting content which will motivate everyone to work out as well and make everyone believe that they can also have good results if they believe in it, and work hard for it too. The last thing that motivates me is my role model. I think everyone has someone that they look up to. For me, that’s Michelle Lewin, she’s an interesting fitness personality, and I like how she made her way to the top in this industry.

Because of Michelle, I will never stop believing in myself.

What workout routine has worked best for you?

I find that what works best for me is using a rep range of 8-12 reps; this allows me to go heavy on the weights. I also like to play around with supersets, drop sets and pyramid sets, and I limit my workouts to 4-5 exercises. I never go over that because adding more exercises feels like a waste of time to me, and I like to execute them correctly.

Full Routine:

Monday: Delts/Abs

  • Smith Machine Shoulder Press 4 x 12 (Superset)
  • Barbell Front Raises 4 x 12
  • Dumbbell Shoulder Press 4 x 12 (Superset)
  • Cable Face Pulls 4 x 12
  • Dumbbell Side Laterals 3 x Failure (Drop Set)
  • Hanging Leg Raises 3 x Failure
  • Lying Leg Raises 4 x 15 (Superset)
  • Crunches 4 x Failure

Tuesday: Quads/Calves

  • Neutral Stance Leg Press 4 x 10
  • Wide Stance Leg Press 4 x 10
  • Narrow Stance Leg Press 4 x 10
  • Reverse Hack Squats 4 x 12 (Superset)
  • Sissy Squats 4 x 12
  • Leg Extensions 4 x 10
  • Standing Calf Raises 4 x 20

Wednesday: Glutes

  • Hip Thrusts 15/12/10/10/8
  • Reverse Hack Squats 4 x 12 (Superset)
  • Abductor 4 x 15-20
  • Smith Machine Reverse Lunges 4 x 20
  • Cable Kickbacks 4 x 12 (each leg)

Thursday: Back/Abs

  • Wide Grip Pull Ups (Warm Up)
  • Bent-Over Barbell Rows 4 x 10
  • Lat Pulldowns 12/12/10/8
  • Seated Cable Rows 4 x 10-12 (Superset)
  • Standing Lat Pulldowns 4 x 12
  • Hanging Leg Raises 4 x Failure
  • Kneeling Cable Crunches 4 x 15-20

Friday: Hams/Glutes

  • Stiff Legged Deadlifts 4 x 12
  • Seated Leg Curls 5 x 12-15
  • Standing Leg Curls 4 x 12
  • Reverse Hack Squats 3 x 15

Saturday: Cardio

Sunday: Rest

What is your secret to your incredible leg and glute development?

When I first started working out, I had no clue as to what would work best for me. I would search on YouTube for exercises that would help me add size to my legs. In the beginning, I worked out my quads three times per week, but they soon became so overdeveloped; that’s when I decided to change my workout routine. Now, I split my leg routine into three different workouts by focusing on one particular leg muscle per training session.

For me, this has been a key contributing factor for my success, and I really would recommend it to anyone who wants to add size to their legs.

If you had to pick only 3 exercises what would they be and why?

  1. Leg Press: There are a lot of variations for the leg press, and I like to mix up my foot positions on this exercise because it allows me to push myself really hard, and it enables me to experience great pumps.
  2. Reverse Hack Squats: I like that this exercise also has a lot of variations to it. When performing the reverse hack squat, I have a great mind-muscle connection for it, and because of this, I can really focus on my muscle contractions.
  3. Walking Lunges: I really love doing these for multiple reasons; I really feel it helps to improve my overall balance, stabilize my core, and it’s great for cardio! My favorite time to do walking lunges is at the end of my work out for a good burn.

What is your diet like?

I prefer to stick with wholesome foods, and I try to limit the use of supplements.

Daily Diet:

  • Meal 1: ¼ cup Oats, 1 scoop Protein, 1 cup Light Yogurt and 1 Apple
  • Meal 2: 5 ounces Low Fat Cottage Cheese, 2 ½ ounces Banana and 1 tablespoon Nuts
  • Meal 3: 3 ½ ounces Chicken, ¼ cup Rice and 1 cup Vegetables
  • Meal 4: 5 ounces Low Fat Cottage Cheese, 1 Apple and 1 tablespoon Peanut Butter
  • Meal 5: 1 scoop Protein and 2 ounces Carbs (post workout)
  • Meal 6: 5 ounces Potatoes, 5 ounces Chicken and 1 cup Vegetables
  • Meal 7: 5 ounces Low Fat Cottage Cheese and 1 small piece Dark Chocolate

What’s the one food you couldn’t live without, and how do you handle food cravings?

The one thing I just couldn’t live without is French bread. I handle my cravings for French bread by overloading myself with it on Sunday mornings haha.

Sunday morning is my set day to go all out on my breakfast; this helps me stay on track with my diet, and it keeps me satisfied throughout the week.

How does your training and diet evolve as you get closer to a competition?

I start prepping at about the twelve week mark. I start by reducing my total daily caloric intake and dropping my carbohydrates slightly. I do this on a weekly basis while adjusting my cardio accordingly.

At the start of my prep, I do cardio 3-4 times per week, but as the competition gets closer, depending on how well my body is reacting to the diet, I will add in additional cardio.

What is your supplementation like?

I like to keep my supplementation very basic.

  • Protein
  • BCAA’s
  • Multivitamin
  • Magnesium

Favorite Quote:

“Don’t stop when you’re tired, stop when you’re done!”

Social Media:

Instagram: @savannahprez
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/savannahprezz/



20 Year Old Belgian Fitness Sensation Savannah Prez was originally published at http://simplyshredded.com/20-year-old-belgian-fitness-sensation-savannah-prez.html







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These standing dynamic stretches make warming up easier than ever

As runners, we’re eager to run. So it’s common to feel like the last thing you have time—or patience—for is a warmup. Besides, the first mile is a junk mile anyway, so why spend extra time stretching when the road or trail is beckoning? ‘For the same reason that warming up your car is crucial,’…

As runners, we’re eager to run. So it’s common to feel like the last thing you have time—or patience—for is a warmup. Besides, the first mile is a junk mile anyway, so why spend extra time stretching when the road or trail is beckoning?

‘For the same reason that warming up your car is crucial,’ says Tony Gentilcore, C.S.C.S., and owner of CORE in Boston. ‘You wouldn’t start your car in sub-freezing temperature, rev it up to 70 mph, and expect it to perform well. A warmup equals better joint lubrication, blood flow, and nervous system activation.’

The physical benefits of warming up are many, but the warmup isn’t just a time to get your body ready to go; it’s also the time to tap into your mind-body connection and get into the right mindset for the miles ahead.

‘With a proper warmup, you decrease your likelihood for injury and also give yourself the adequate time to prepare mentally for the load you’re about to endure,’ says Corinne Fitzgerald, NSCA-CPT, head coach of Mile High Run Club in New York City. ‘After all, a workout is always part physical, part mental.’

We all kind of already know it’s important to warm up, and yet we are notorious for neglecting to do so. One of the excuses—er, reasons is practicality: When you’re in a parking lot, a race corral, or at a trailhead, you can’t exactly roll out a yoga mat and start stretching.

The other limiting factor that often comes up is time, or rather, lack thereof. ‘Most runners are in a rush,’ says Fitzgerald. ‘They allow only a specific amount of time for their miles, but they forget that the warmup and cooldown should be added into the equation when carving out time in your schedule.’ She suggests considering your warmup as part of your workout, not an unnecessary add-on.

While the perfect warmup can vary per person and workout, five minutes of performing basic moves is a low investment that reaps big rewards like offsetting potential injuries. This warmup is a combination of do-anywhere dynamic stretches that will get your body ready to run. You can do them all standing so it doesn’t matter where you are. All you need is five minutes and you’re good to go.

How to use this list: Perform each exercise below for 60 seconds. Each move is demonstrated by Matthew Meyer, head run coach at Mile High Run Club in New York City, so you can learn the perfect form. If you have more time, repeat the series 1 to 2 more times for a 10- to 15-minute warmup.


1. Standing Hip Controlled Articular Rotation (CAR)

How to do it: Stand tall on your right leg and raise the left knee to 90-degrees in line with left hip. Brace your core, keep your pelvis in a neutral position, and place hands on hips for balance. Rotate left knee out to the side, then down and in toward your centerline, then back up to the starting position—think of it as drawing a circle in the air with your knee. The pace here is slow and controlled; be sure to keep your pelvis and lower back as still as possible while doing this movement. The goal is to increase the range of motion in the hip joint. Repeat 5 to 10 times per side for a total of 60 seconds.

Why do it: ‘These help you asses and improve your range of motion and lubricate the hip joint. They also increase mobility, which will be beneficial not only for your immediate workout but also for your joint health in the long run,’ says Fitzgerald.

Doing this exercise consistently is key. There’s not a lot of dynamic hip motion involved with running, and ‘if you don’t use your hip mobility, you lose it,’ adds Gentilcore.


2. Lunge With Side Bend

How to do it: Stand tall with feet hip-distance apart, engage your core, and place hands on hips. Take a big step forward with left foot. Bend left knee to a 90-degree angle to lower down until left thigh is parallel to the floor with knee centred over your ankle. Bend right knee slightly as right heel lifts off the floor. When you feel stable, rest left forearm on left thigh and reach the right arm straight overhead, creating length in your right side body. Then bend your torso over to the left while stretching the right arm over your head to the left. Hold for 5 seconds. Return to standing and repeat on the other side. Continue to alternate for 60 seconds.

Why do it: ‘Running is a single-leg activity, so it makes sense to warm up with a single-leg variation,’ Gentilcore says. ‘The side bend adds an additional plane of motion—frontal—which many runners fail to train.’

Fitzgeralds also likes this stretch because it prepares you for the single-leg load you experience during the run, stretches out the quad all the way to the shoulder, and opens the pathway for more oxygen to come in while you breathe.


3. Standing Quad/Hip Flexor Stretch

How to do it: Stand tall and engage your core. Bend your right leg to bring right heel up toward your right glute and grasp your right ankle with your right hand. Pull your ankle into your glute while simultaneously tucking your tailbone down towards the ground, trying to posteriorly tilt your pelvis. You should feel the stretch along the length of your quad up into the front of your hips. Hold for 30 seconds, then repeat on the other side.

Why do it: ‘The standing quad stretch opens up the front of the leg and helps lengthen your hip flexors,’ Fitzgerald says. Tight hip flexors can affect the hamstring’s ability to activate fully, adds Gentilcore.

Beyond the stretch, this move has additional benefits. ‘Standing on one leg at a time also helps to focus on stability and the firing of the core muscles to hold your posture upright,’ Fitzgerald adds.


4. Lateral Squat Stretch

How to do it: Stand tall with your feet wide apart and your toes pointing forward. Clasp your hands in front of chest for balance. Shift your weight onto your right foot and bend right knee as you send hips back as though you were going to sit in a chair while keeping the left leg straight. Make sure your right knee does not move forward past your right toes. Aim to get your right thigh as horizontal as possible. You should feel a stretch along the muscles of your left inner thigh. Hold this position for 5 seconds, then switch to the other side. Repeat for 60 seconds.

Why do it: ‘Adding in more frontal plane motion [with this movement] is a nice way to add variety and amplitude to a runner’s life. Plus, the adductors and groin are almost always ‘tight’ with most people,’ says Gentilcore. Tight adductors can seriously mess with your stride, Fitzgerald explains, so loosening them up can promote better form.


5. Standing Dynamic Hamstring/Calf Stretch

How to do it: Stand with feet hip-distance apart. Place the heel of the right foot about 12 inches in front of you and flex the foot. Keeping the right leg straight, shift your weight onto the left leg while bending it slightly at the knee, and send your hips back—you should feel a stretch down the back of your right leg. Stay in this position and point the right foot, hold for 5 seconds, then flex the foot for 5 seconds. Repeat this 3 times per leg.

Why do it: ‘The hamstrings are a major muscle group that power the running motion. [This stretch] can allow you to get deep into the hamstring without static or over-stretching,’ Fitzgerald says. Plus, this move does double-duty with a calf stretch.

Tight calves are an almost universal concern for runners and can contribute to several issues. That’s because the gastrocnemius muscle crosses the knee joint and is often a culprit of knee pain, according to Gentilcore.

‘Your calves are smaller muscles that handle a ton of load and spring as a runner,’ adds Fitzgerald. ‘With a point and flex of your foot, you can warm up the entire backside of your leg.’


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These standing dynamic stretches make warming up easier than ever was originally published at https://trib.al/blUIDfc