July 29, 2020

Build serious endurance with this strength-training workout – no intervals required and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Build serious endurance with this strength-training workout – no intervals required, 6 Week, High Frequency, Full Body, Muscle-Building Program – Fitness and Power, A Sports Strength & Conditioning Workout To Build Power, Stamina And Strength and A Guy Spent a Day Trying to Eat Like a Vegetarian Version of The Rock, Says It’s was Too Stressful – Fitness and Power. Hope you enjoy them…

Build serious endurance with this strength-training workout – no intervals required

Strength-training intervals are pretty polarising: You either love them or you hate them—there are few that fall in-between. Many of us consider intervals to be the holy grail of ramping up fitness fast (and make no mistake—they do!), but if you fly the flag of Team Anything-But-Intervals, we have a workout for you. The key…

Strength-training intervals are pretty polarising: You either love them or you hate them—there are few that fall in-between. Many of us consider intervals to be the holy grail of ramping up fitness fast (and make no mistake—they do!), but if you fly the flag of Team Anything-But-Intervals, we have a workout for you.

The key to gaining endurance from this strength circuit is going immediately from one exercise into the next with no recovery between sets. This keeps your cardiovascular system working hard from beginning to end without any intense, eye-crossing efforts.

‘This is an endurance plus strength circuit combined, a brutal workout (in a good way!)’ says Ela Dugan, a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach in Cambridge, MA. ‘Keeping your heart rate elevated for the entire circuit challenges your aerobic capacity.’

Prepare for a total-body workout with an emphasis on building core strength that will transfer directly into your running performance and compliment your run training. ‘The circuit is especially core-dominant, which is a great way to keep the challenge high, without the need for constant impact,’ says Dugan.

This format is also a plus for those of us who are short on time, trying to squeeze in a sweat session in between seemingly-endless Zoom meetings. ‘Keeping the rest time limited during the circuit is a great way to train efficiently,’ Dugan adds. ‘That means you can really get a lot of bang for your buck in a pretty short period of time.’ Ready to get started?

How to do this workout: Perform 3 rounds of the complete circuit below with no rest in between the exercises. Each exercise is performed by a certified trainer so you can learn the proper form. Rest for 2 minutes between each round before starting again. You don’t need any equipment for this workout, and you can do it anywhere you have enough room to plank. An exercise mat is optional.

Remember, form—not speed—is key. Don’t rush the exercises. The aim here is to build endurance, not race against the clock. Review the exercises and instructions below, and familiarise yourself with the moves before you do the workout for the first time so that you can go directly from one exercise to the next without having to stop.


Jump squat

Start with your feet about shoulder-width apart. Hinge at the hips and send butt back as you bend knees to lower down into a squat. Keep your knees behind the toes, and don’t arch your low back by keeping your core engaged. Press through the mid-foot and heel, squeeze your glutes and jump straight up from the squat position. Land softly and lower back down into a squat. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


Walk-out to push-up

Start in a standing position with feet hip-width apart. Hinge at the hips and bring your hands to the floor keeping your legs as straight at possible without locking your knees. Walk your hands out in front of you to come to a high plank position, with shoulders over wrists and core engaged. Bend elbows to lower chest to floor, perform a push-up, then from a high plank, walk your hands back toward your feet. Return to a standing position. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


High-low plank

Start in a high plank position with hands directly beneath shoulders, glutes engaged, and a braced core. Keep a soft bend in elbows. Keeping your core engaged and hips stabilised, drop left forearm to the floor, then right forearm to the floor, to come into a low plank. Keep hips as stable as possible. From low plank, hold for 1 to 2 seconds, then push yourself back up to high plank one arm at a time. Again, focus on not rocking your hips. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


Superman

Lie facedown in a supine position with your arms stretched out overhead, palms facing the floor. Engage your core and press your pelvis into the floor. While maintaining this engagement, squeeze your glutes and lift your legs off the floor while simultaneously lifting your arms and shoulders off the floor. Instead, focus on your glutes and hamstrings lifting your legs, and your upper back muscles lifting your arms and shoulders. Hold for 1 to 2 seconds before lowering back down. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


Side plank to thread the needle

Start in a low side plank on left side, with left elbow directly under your shoulder. Line yourself up so there is a straight line from your ankles, knees, hips, shoulders and head. Engage your glutes and lift your hips up as high as possible. Once stable, extend the right arm straight up. Rotating from the waist and maintaining your body’s straight line, reach the right arm down and under your left underarm. Reverse the movement. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


Push-up to knee touch

Start in a high plank with your hands directly underneath shoulders, and your core and glutes engaged. Perform a push up by bending elbows and lowering your chest to the floor. Avoid sticking your chin out towards the floor or letting your low back arch or sag. Press back up then touch right hand to left knee by drawing knee to chest. Repeat the push-up then touch left hand to right knee. Continue switching sides after each push-up. Repeat for 20 reps, 10 reps on each side.


Bicycle crunch

Lie faceup and press your lower back into the floor while lifting your legs into a tabletop position so shins are parallel to floor and knees form a 90-degree angle. Place your fingertips at your temples while opening your bent elbows out to the sides. From here, peel your right shoulder up while simultaneously drawing your left knee in to chest, pulling them both towards your centreline while extending the right leg away from you. Draw right elbow to left knee. Return to centre then draw left elbow to right knee. Don’t let your lower back lose contact with the floor. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


Hollow hold to V-sit

Lie faceup on the floor. Engage your core to peel both your upper body and feet straight up to come to a hollow hold. From there, draw knees in to chest so legs come to tabletop position with shins parallel to floor and knees forming a 90-degree angle as you simultaneously lift shoulders higher. Your body should form a V. Keep both arms extended straight towards your feet, and your shoulders relaxed. Lower back to the hollow hold. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 15 reps.


Plyo lunge

Drop into a lunge position by stepping your right leg forward and bending both legs to 90-degree angles, so left knee hovers above the floor. Keep chest lifted and the right knee centered over the ankle. From here, explosively jump straight up and switch legs in the air, landing softly in a lunge with your left leg in front and right knee hovering. That is 1 rep. Repeat for 20 reps. Rest for two minutes before repeating the entire circuit from the top.


All images: Julia Hembree Smith

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Build serious endurance with this strength-training workout – no intervals required was originally published at https://trib.al/OHfxKqP






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6 Week, High Frequency, Full Body, Muscle-Building Program – Fitness and Power

It’s the right time we stop with the millions of “bro splits” on the Internet and add slabs of muscle to your frame by training each muscle group 4 times a week. Training is (almost) the same as any other skill. The more you do it, the better you get at it. In this case,…

It’s the right time we stop with the millions of “bro splits” on the Internet and add slabs of muscle to your frame by training each muscle group 4 times a week.

Training is (almost) the same as any other skill. The more you do it, the better you get at it. In this case, you become bigger as a result. And the more frequently you can train each muscle or muscle group (and recover from the training) , the faster it will respond to training stimulus. So, if you’ve been training just one or two muscle groups per workout session, with a total of only one workout session for that specific muscle group per week, we’re sorry to say but that’s simply not enough for optimal growth. Get ready to switch to a full-body, high-frequency training routine which will bring about the gains, unlike anything you’ve ever tried before.

Let’s talk about the cons of the high-volume bro splits. They will exhaust your trained muscles too much and too fast. For example, if your chest workout day consists of six different exercises for the pecs, they will need a lot more time to recover before they can be trained again. Sure, it’s good to target a muscle from all possible angles and increase its work capacity, however recovering for a week until the next workout, eliminates the possibility of the muscle being exposed to the same training stimulus again sooner, which is a wasted opportunity for more growth. And we know that protein synthesis stays elevated for roughly about 30 hours after resistance training.

To be able to train a muscle more often, you will have to decrease the work or the volume during a single workout session, but that shouldn’t scare you. Instead of training your pecs with 12 sets in one session, you can do those 12 sets spread throughout the whole week, with each session building upon the gains you made in the previous one. However, decreasing the amount of training volume isn’t enough to recover fully. You will also have to choose your exercises carefully.

The reason for this is that even though muscle generally responds well to being trained often, your joints can have quite a difficult time with it. For example, performing heavy bench presses one day and then doing overhead presses and dips the next day can wreak havoc on your shoulder joints and increase the chances of injury. To train often and safely, you need to choose primarily joint-friendly movements whilst keeping recovery as a priority. That’s why you’ll notice the presence of various chest-supported rowing exercises and body-weight movements in our training program.

Training your whole body in one training session will bring about balanced muscle gains and target your muscles at a higher frequency, namely four times in just one week. Do the math: if you were training your shoulders once a week, that’s a total of 52 shoulder workouts in a year. If you start training them for times a week, you get a total of 208 workouts a year. What do you think your shoulders will look like after that increase? You guessed it, they’ll be considerably bigger.

Continues on next page – The 6 week High Frequency Workout >>



6 Week, High Frequency, Full Body, Muscle-Building Program – Fitness and Power was originally published at https://www.fitnessandpower.com/build-muscle/high-frequency-full-body-muscle-building-program







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A Sports Strength & Conditioning Workout To Build Power, Stamina And Strength

If you’re a keen sportsperson who only has time for one supportive strength and conditioning workout a week, then we urge you to make it this one. It’s been put together by James Griffiths, personal trainer and founder of Wild Training, and it’s an absolute cracker. “This workout is great for athletes who don’t have…

If you’re a keen sportsperson who only has time for one supportive strength and conditioning workout a week, then we urge you to make it this one. It’s been put together by James Griffiths, personal trainer and founder of Wild Training, and it’s an absolute cracker.

“This workout is great for athletes who don’t have a lot of time for general conditioning outside of their sport, because it’s so efficient,” says Griffiths. “You use a heavy set to activate the muscle, followed immediately by an explosive exercise in a similar movement pattern. The fast-twitch focus helps to burn fat and improve definition while the superset nature of the workout keeps you breathing hard and sweating lots.”

How To Do This Workout

After a thorough warm-up, complete each pair of exercises, rest, then repeat that pair until all the sets are completed. Then move on to the next pair of exercises.

Griffiths suggests doing three or four sets of each exercise and resting for one or two minutes between supersets. We’ve included the easier option in the workout guide below.

1A Hex bar deadlift

Sets 3 Reps 5 Rest 0sec

“The fact you can load so much more centrally on a hex bar compared to an Olympic bar means you can go heavy,” says Griffiths. “Use a tap and go technique – the weights shouldn’t rest on the floor between reps. We want to keep the muscles under tension.”

Stand in the middle of the bar with your feet hip-width apart. Reach down and grab the handles of the bar, then sit back and raise your chest and shoulders so you’re looking forwards. Keep your back flat as you lift the bar by straightening your knees and hips.

1B Jump squat

Sets 3 Reps 10 Rest 2min

From standing, drop into a deep squat, then drive back up and jump up.

“Focus on a deep range of movement, an explosive transition going from down to up, and a soft landing so you decelerate smoothly all the way to the bottom,” says Griffiths.

2A Dumbbell bench press

Sets 3 Reps 5 Rest 0sec

“I like the dumbbell bench press a lot because it’s easier to go heavy without feeling like you need a spotter, and it requires a fair bit of control through the shoulders,” says Griffiths.

Lie on the bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand in an overhand grip. Push the weights up, then bring them back down slowly.

2B Clap press-up

Sets 3 Reps 10 Rest 2min

Get into a press-up position and lower your chest towards the floor. Push back up explosively so your hands come off the ground. Clap once before landing and go straight into another press-up.

“Aim for a deep range of movement, a fast change in direction at the bottom and a soft landing,” says Griffiths. “Push through your fingertips, like a basketball jump shot, for extra zip.”

3A Bulgarian split squat

Sets 3 Reps 5 each side Rest 0sec

“Rest the toes of one foot on a bench, but don’t have any of your laces on the bench – we don’t want any weight on that elevated foot,” says Griffiths. “Your standing leg should be just in front of the knee of the raised leg. Hold dumbbells in each hand, with the weight on the raised leg side in front of your thigh to help balance. Drop down and just touch the floor with your knee before coming back up. Keep your torso as vertical as possible.”

3B Jump lunge

Sets 3 Reps 10 each side Rest 2min

From standing, take a big step forwards into a lunge position. Jump straight up and swap your feet around so you land in a lunge position with your feet reversed.

“Try to land and take off on both feet at the same time,” says Griffiths.

4A Chin-up

Sets 3 Reps 5 Rest 0sec

“A chin-up or weighted chin-up is a great way of getting a lot of your pulling muscles working,” says Griffiths. “Keep your shoulders retracted and perform the reps smoothly for the full range of movement.”

4B Slastix standing row

Sets 3 Reps 10 Rest 2min

“The reason I’ve suggested using Slastix resistance bands for the standing row is the valuable physiological benefits of training with elasticated resistance for power,” says Griffiths. “If you don’t have decent-quality Slastix like Stroops go with an inverted row on a Smith machine or similar.

“With the standing row you should have your shoulders in front of your hips. Maintain a neutral spine and fix the position of your head, shoulders and hips. With the Slastix attached to an anchor point in front of you, pull the handles towards your ribs, keeping your elbows close to your body.



A Sports Strength & Conditioning Workout To Build Power, Stamina And Strength was originally published at https://www.coachmag.co.uk/full-body-workouts/8646/a-sports-strength-conditioning-workout-to-build-power-stamina-and-strength







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A Guy Spent a Day Trying to Eat Like a Vegetarian Version of The Rock, Says It’s was Too Stressful – Fitness and Power

Athletes have always told me how eating enough to fuel their training becomes a chore. I wanted to discover for myself what it feels like. I don’t know what’s wrong with me: On an average day, I can easily eat six hard-boiled eggs in one sitting, and today, in celebration of my Day of Bulking,…

Athletes have always told me how eating enough to fuel their training becomes a chore. I wanted to discover for myself what it feels like.

I don’t know what’s wrong with me: On an average day, I can easily eat six hard-boiled eggs in one sitting, and today, in celebration of my Day of Bulking, I’ve even bought large eggs—instead of jumbo—to make them easier to pop into my mouth whole, like super-sized Tic Tacs. But after the third one slides down my throat, I’ve already lost my appetite. This doesn’t bode well.

Today is my first time bulking, the process of eating more calories than your body burns in order to add muscle mass. Generally, there are two ways people go about this process, says Brad Schoenfeld, a professor of exercise science and director of the human performance lab at CUNY Lehman College. For the first—known as a “dirty” bulk—you add roughly 1,000 calories to your diet and gain both muscle and fat. For the second—known as a “clean” bulk—you add 300 to 500 calories, which adds muscle mass more slowly but reduces the fat you put on.

Schoenfeld, however, stresses that each person will gain muscle differently depending on their current diet, history of exercise, body composition, training methods, and goals. To prove his point, he shows me a study in which the participants weight trained for 16 weeks. The top quartile saw their muscle mass increase by 58 percent, the middle two quartiles saw an increase of 28 percent, and the bottom saw no gains at all. (My heart goes out to them.) The best way to bulk, Schoenfeld tells me, is to re-evaluate every three to four weeks.

For me, a 5’9″ 175-pound CrossFitter of two years who generally eats well and consumes about 3,500 calories a day, Schoenfeld estimates that, over a three-month period, I might expect to put on four to five pounds of muscle and a couple pounds of fat if I did the 1,000-calorie bulk. When I tell him that I’ll be attempting to eat as many calories as possible in one day—ideally, 6,000 total, 2,500 calories above his recommendations—he isn’t encouraging: “The additional muscle you’d be gaining would be minimal.”

I know that Schoenfeld is right—and, after today, I’ll switch to a 4,000-calorie “clean” bulk the remainder of the month in order to gain strength without getting too heavy for bodyweight movements like pull-ups and rope climbs. For the next sixteen hours, however, I want to push my limits without any restrictions. Why? For one thing, I’m almost always hungry but never have the energy, time, or money to eat as much as I’d like. Athletes have told me how eating enough to fuel their training becomes a chore, and I want to discover for myself what it feels like to be on the same level as, say, Dwayne Johnson’s 5,500-calorie cod-based diet or Michael Phelps’ 12,000-calorie Olympic diet.
Continues on next page…



A Guy Spent a Day Trying to Eat Like a Vegetarian Version of The Rock, Says It’s was Too Stressful – Fitness and Power was originally published at https://www.fitnessandpower.com/fitness-stories/guy-spent-day-trying-eat-like-vegetarian-version-rock