July 12, 2020

Eat 5 fruits and vegetables a day and More…

In today’s Body Shapr Digest we bring you articles on Eat 5 fruits and vegetables a day, Most Common Fitness Mistakes, Lockdown Lowdown: and Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions due to COVID-19. Hope you enjoy them…

Eat 5 fruits and vegetables a day

We all see all of the colors of the vegetables when we go to the grocery store, but do you know what vitamins, minerals and other nutrients are in the vegetables that we eat base on the color of the vegetable? CDC in the US has been promoting people to eat at least five servings…

We all see all of the colors of the vegetables when we go to the grocery store, but do you know what vitamins, minerals and other nutrients are in the vegetables that we eat base on the color of the vegetable?

CDC in the US has been promoting people to eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

As you probably know there are many ways to make yourself healthier and eating fruits and vegetables in higher quantities will definitely make a difference of how you look and feel.

Eat plenty of different fruits and vegetables. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.

Fruits and vegetables provide essential vitamins and minerals, fiber, and other substances that are important for good health. Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories and are filling.

5 A Day for Better Health is a national program and partnership that seeks to increase the number of daily servings of fruits and vegetables Americans eat to five or more.

The 5 A Day program provides easy ways to add more fruits and vegetables into your daily eating patterns.

Fruit And Vegetable Resources

Fruit and Vegetable of the Month
Each month a fruit and vegetable are featured with nutritional information, tips on how to prepare them and great tasting recipes.

Color Your Way to 5 A Day
5adayfruits.jpgTheThere are thousands of health promoting phytochemicals found in plants.

Research is just beginning to understand how they work to improve health, so it’s important to eat a wide variety of colorful orange/yellow, red, green, white, and blue/purple vegetables and fruit every day.

By eating vegetables and fruit from each color group, you will benefit from the unique array of phytochemicals, as well as essential vitamins, minerals, and fiber that each color group has to offer alone and in combination.

Here is a list of all of the colors and the nutrients that those colors provide.

More Color More Health

Growing up you may have been told to eat your greens, but what about your reds, oranges, yellows and blues?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the 5 A Day Partnership encourages YOU to “Sample the Spectrum” of the colorful vegetables and fruit available this season.

By putting something of every color on your plate or in your lunch bag, you are more likely to eat the 5 to 9 recommended servings of vegetables and fruit every day. Just think:

  • 1 cup of dark, leafy GREENS
  • ½ cup of RED tomatoes
  • ½ cup of YELLOW peppers
  • 6 oz. ORANGE juice
  • ½ cup of BLUEberries.

And you have 5 A Day! It’s quite simple when you Sample the Spectrum.

The more reds, oranges, greens, yellows, and blues you see on the plate, the more health promoting properties you are also getting from your vegetable and fruit choices.

Nutrition research shows that colorful vegetables and fruit contain essential vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals that your body needs to promote health and help you feel great. Here are the specifics…

Reds Vegetables

fruits-and-vegetablesWhen you add deep reds or bright pinks to your daily diet, you are also adding a powerful antioxidant called lycopene.

Lycopene is found in tomatoes, red and pink grapefruit, watermelon, papaya and guava.

Diets rich in lycopene are being studied for their ability to fight heart disease and some cancers.

Greens Vegetables

Do you know why this color is so essential to your diet? Not only do green vegetables look great and taste wonderful, but they are rich in the phytochemicals that keep you healthy.

For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin that are found in spinach, collards, kale and broccoli have antioxidant properties and are being studied for their ability to protect your eyes by keeping your retina strong.

Also, research is being done on cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, and turnips to see if they may reduce the risk of cancerous tumors! Greens are also loaded with essential vitamins (folate), minerals, and fiber.

Orange and Yellow Vegetables

Orange, the color of a blazing sun, is a must have in your daily diet. Orange vegetables and fruits like sweet potatoes, mangos, carrots, and apricots, contain beta-carotene.

This carotenoid is a natural antioxidant that is being studied for its role in enhancing the immune system. In addition to being touted as a powerful health-protector, the orange group is rich in Vitamin C.

Folate, most often found in leafy greens, is also found in orange fruits and vegetables, and is a B vitamin that may help prevent some birth defects and reduce your risk of heart disease. With a chemical make-up this good, make the orange group always a part of your 5 to 9 a day.

Bright yellows have many of the same perks as the orange groups: high in essential vitamins and carotenoids.

Pineapple, for example, is rich with Vitamin C, manganese, and the natural enzyme, bromelain. Additionally, corn and pears are high in fiber.

Yellow fruits and vegetables belong to many different families, but they all share the common bond of being health enhancing with great taste. Go for the gold!

Blue and Purples Vegetables

Blues and purples not only add beautiful shades of tranquility and richness to your plate, they add health-enhancing flavonoids, phytochemicals, and antioxidants.

Anthocyanins, a phytochemical, are pigments responsible for the blue color in vegetables and fruits, and are being studied for their role in the body’s defense of harmful carcinogens.

Blue and purple produce have many different nutrients including, lutein, zeaxanthin, resveratrol, Vitamin C, fiber, flavonoids, ellagic acid, and quercetin. Many of these nutrients are also found in red fruits and vegetables as well.

Try these blue and purple vegetables: Eggplant, Cabbage, Endive, Asparagus, Carrots

Blueberries, in particular, are rich in Vitamin C and folic acid and high in fiber and potassium.

White Vegetables

Vegetables from the onion family, which include garlic, chives, scallions, leeks, and any variety of onion, contain the phytochemical allicin. Research is being conducted on

Allicin to learn how it may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure and increase the body’s ability to fight infections.

Indoles and sulfaforaphanes, phytochemicals in cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower, for how they may inhibit cancer growth.

Polyphenols, another important phytochemical in pears and green grapes for how they may reduce the risk of certain cancers.

Savor the Spectrum of Color All Year Long

There is color in every season. When it comes to your health, you’ll fare best with a multi-colored diet.

Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant, which means that, among nutrients, it has a greater-than-average ability to “quench” free radicals that cause damage to cells.

Excessive free radical damage has been implicated in the development of heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease and many cancers, as well as accelerated aging

Although phytonutrients aren’t essential for keeping you alive, unlike the vitamins and minerals that plant foods contain. But when you eat or drink phytonutrients, they may help prevent disease and keep your body working properly.

More than 25,000 phytonutrients are found in plant foods.

Flavonoids are important antioxidants, and promote several health effects. Aside from antioxidant activity, these molecules provide the following beneficial effects:

  • Anti-viral
  • Anti-cancer
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-allergic

One flavonoid called quercetin can help to alleviate eczema, sinusitis, asthma, and hay fever. Some studies have shown that flavonoid intake is inversely related to heart disease, with these molecules inhibiting the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins and therefore reducing the risk of atherosclerosis developing.

By putting something of every color on your plate or in your lunch bag, you are more likely to eat the recommended 5 to 9 servings of vegetables and fruits every day.

Think color: 1 cup of dark, leafy salad GREENS with WHITE onions sprinkled on top, ½ cup of RED tomatoes, ½ cup of YELLOW pineapple chunks, 6 oz. ORANGE juice and ½ cup of BLUEberries. Delicious and healthy!



Eat 5 fruits and vegetables a day was originally published at https://www.fitnesstipsforlife.com/eat-5-fruits-and-vegetables-a-day.html






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Most Common Fitness Mistakes

Are you doing your best in the gym and with healthy eating, but aren’t seeing any improvements in your physique? Here are 10 common fitness mistakes that could prevent you from reaching your goals. 1. Skipping meals. This will slow your metabolism and result in fat gain. Eat your protein, fat and carb requirement in your diet—don’t try to eat less. It is necessary to…

Are you doing your best in the gym and with healthy eating, but aren’t seeing any improvements in your physique? Here are 10 common fitness mistakes that could prevent you from reaching your goals.

10 Common Fitness Mistakes

1. Skipping meals. This will slow your metabolism and result in fat gain. Eat your protein, fat and carb requirement in your diet—don’t try to eat less. It is necessary to eat enough to see results. Your muscles need fuel for recovery, and this fuel is FOOD.

2. Trying “magical” solutions. Consistency and discipline = results! Work hard, because there are no easy and fast answers! Be patient and believe in the process.

3. Not drinking enough water. Keeping your body hydrated will help you in many ways. Our body needs water to function, and when we exercise, we lose water, electrolytes etc. Remember that muscles are 75 percent water! A study from Germany found that protein synthesis occurs at a higher rate in muscle cells that are well hydrated, compared with dehydrated cells.

4. Obsessing. No one is perfect! So try to look your best and do your best, but also love yourself!

5. Eliminating all carbs. This is a BIG mistake, because carbs fuel athletic performance and keep your muscles looking round and full. Be careful when you select your carbs. Try to include fruits, vegetables and high fiber carbs in your meals. I like oats, sweet potatoes and rice. Avoid eating processed foods.

6. Overtraining and not getting enough rest. Your body progresses when it has rested appropriately and also had the time for recovery! Sometimes more is less. Sleep at least eight hours per night and don’t train seven days per week, because your body requires time to restore and build muscles.

7. Doing the same workout routine. Change the sets, the repetition, the machines, and/or the exercises to prevent the “plateau.” Pick up heavier weights— don’t be afraid to lift heavy, and you will notice changes!

8. Doing 1,000+ crunches. Abs are made in the kitchen! Balance and proper diet is the answer to having amazing abdominals. If your abs are covered by fat, you can do as many crunches as you want and you will never see your six-pack!

9. Doing too much cardio. Cardio helps your cardiovascular health, but don’t be obsessive about doing hours and hours of stationary cardio! Do intervals, train faster and change your cardio routines as well.

10. Avoiding weight training. Some girls are worried about the “bulky look” when weight training, but gaining muscle is not as easy as we think! You look bulky when your diet is not correct! Weight training increases your metabolism, and you will burn more calories after weight training.

Take care about your health and your metabolism by doing things correctly in your fitness and nutrition programs!

References:

http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/foods_that_build_muscle/Water_The_Muscle_Bath.php#ixzz2iT1Lb6XQ



Most Common Fitness Mistakes was originally published at https://www.fitnessrxwomen.com/life-health/most-common-fitness-mistakes/







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Lockdown Lowdown:

“Progressive resistance” has been the primary principle among lifters since weight training first began. The principle is typically applied by adding greater load (“resistance”) during workouts over time (“progressively”). For example, if you can do 12 repetitions with 25 pounds in a given exercise, the next workout you would increase to 30 pounds, likely for…

“Progressive resistance” has been the primary principle among lifters since weight training first began. The principle is typically applied by adding greater load (“resistance”) during workouts over time (“progressively”). For example, if you can do 12 repetitions with 25 pounds in a given exercise, the next workout you would increase to 30 pounds, likely for 8 to 10 reps. Then in successive workouts you would increase back up to 12 reps with that weight, at which point you would move up to 35 pounds in the next workout and repeat the process. This can work for quite a while. It’s the way most of us have added mass to our frames.

But while progressive resistance by increasing the load can serve weight trainers well for many years, especially during youth, the principle ultimately starts to betray us. The human body has its limits. Heavy weights over a long period of time will place great stress on your joints and connective tissue. The aging process itself plays a part. I am seeing so many of my “mature” bodybuilding friends, including former IFBB pros, now having to undergo shoulder, hip, or knee replacements.

The problem with “progressive resistance” is the implication that progress requires using heavier and heavier weights. We think of it as simple arithmetic. So, most of us buy into the premise that reducing the poundage will reduce our progress. Overcoming this mindset can be difficult, especially for those of us who have built our physiques by heavy loads for many decades. Look, like many of us who have trained for decades at Bev’s Gym, the famous “East Coast Mecca,” I like to take my stab at the big weights. It makes me feel like I accomplished something at the end of a workout. “Going light” or even “lighter” makes many of us feel, deep in that irrational corner of our psyches, that we are half-assing it, selling out, or wasting our time. Even the most experienced among us can fall prey to the “go heavy” whispers of our internal egos.

Enter, the lockdown. Here in New York, gyms have been closed since March. We can debate the merits of such a long-term statewide gym closure, but that’s for another time. For those of us who self-identify as bodybuilders and for whom “gym life” was part of our standard routine, it’s disconcerting. Some peeps chose to take some time away from the gym. I wasn’t one of them. I set up a modest training area in a little corner of my basement and continued training. I’ll save the equipment specifics for another time, but suffice it to say that I am seriously limited in terms of the “resistance” poundage. No Olympic barbells, no fancy machines. I couldn’t do heavy compound barbell movements like squats, benches or deadlifts. So, I opted for what compound bodyweight and dumbbell movements I could, and mostly relied on various isolation movements. I’d built a good amount of mass from 40 years of lifting, but my question was whether I could maintain or even grow by employing creative alternatives to heavier loads.

So, here’s my take. I think “progressive resistance” is a terrible name for the training process of building muscle. In the end, it leads to injury, especially for older trainers. Rather than thinking in terms of progressive resistance, I suggest the far better name (and concept) is progressive intensity. I believe that we can continue to progress as while lifting weights, even after decades of training, by focusing on intensity, not resistance. Sure, greater resistance is a method of increasing the intensity. But it’s only one method of many. And, especially after the age of 50, I think it is of lesser value than other variables and potentially counterproductive due to its stress on joints and connective tissue.

The popularity of blood flow restriction training is a testament to the effectiveness of lower load training for muscle growth and strength (avoiding the joint and connective tissue stress caused by heavy weights). While it’s beyond the scope of this article, research supports that the use of bands to restrict blood flow to the working muscle can stimulate hypertrophy with as little as 20 percent of a one-rep maximum. You can check out this recent article for more information on this training method: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6530612/.

More well-known and traditional intensity principles can also be used as alternatives to heavier weights. All of these training methods work particularly well in the home gym environment, and are great for more mature lifters to add intensity with less wear and tear on the joints, tendons and ligaments.

More Reps. Keeping a muscle under tension for a longer time is a method to force a muscle-building adaptive response. One way to do this is with sets consisting of higher repetitions. At the same cadence, a set with 20 reps will keep the muscle under tension for twice as long as a set of 10 reps. How many reps is too many (i.e., how long is too long) remains controversial and likely depends on individual physiological characteristics as well as the speed of performance (see below). But increasing the reps to 12, 15 or even 20 can spur a great pump and provoke new growth.

Slower Reps. Another way to extend the time under tension is by slowing down the reps. This can be done either by doing the whole set “super-slow” (e.g., a count of 6 seconds for both the concentric and eccentric contractions, for a total of 5 repetitions) or by slowing down only the eccentric (negative) portion of the movement. Either way, a lighter weight will “feel” heavy as lactic acid builds and the muscle fatigues. A set of only 5 reps, with 6 seconds to raise the weight and 6 to lower it, will take a full minute. Trust me, you’ll feel it!

Burns. This technique extends the time under tension by doing partial reps when you can no longer complete a full rep. For example, when you can no longer complete a biceps curl in the full range of motion, you can continue the set by doing partial reps from the bottom only for as many as you can.

Pre-Exhaust. By doing an isolation (single-joint) movement and following it with a compound (multi-joint) movement to target the same muscle, you will pre-fatigue the muscle with the first movement and need less weight for the compound movement. For example, you could do dumbbell flyes for chest and then immediately follow them with dumbbell bench presses or push-ups. IFBB pro Mike Mentzer was one of the proponents of this training style.

21’s. Another intensity technique using partial reps. Here you would do 7 reps in only one half of the range of motion, followed by 7 reps in only the other half of the movement, and then go right into 7 reps through the movement’s full range.

Supersets. This technique can be done in one of two ways – either with two exercises for the same body part (e.g., two different deltoid movements) or with two exercises for different body parts (e.g., a triceps movement and a biceps movement) without a rest between them. For our purposes of reducing the load, picking two movements for the same muscle will surely mean you’ll need less weight in the second exercise to feel the intensity.

Shorter Rest Intervals. Simply taking less time between sets will require a reduced load, although my experience is that too little time prevents adequate recovery. For me, less than a minute between sets hampers my ability to put on muscle size.

Higher Volume. Actually, of all the intensity principles outlined, I have found this has made the most significant difference for me during lockdown. Even though I reduced the poundages, I have maintained muscle size by simply doing more sets than I usually would. When I’m in the gym and handling heavier weights, I tend to feel over-trained when I do too many sets for a muscle group. But training in my basement with lighter weights, I feel like my body needs the extra sets. I’ve been doing high-rep push-ups in “sets” of as many as I can do with one or two minute rest intervals until I do 300 push-ups. My chest has lost NO size even without bench presses.

So, there you have it. I don’t know when this lockdown will end and I will escape from my basement quarantine. But I do know that my joints are feeling good these days, and my muscles aren’t disappearing even without the gym. When I get back to Bev’s, I will focus on progressive intensity over resistance. Hopefully I’ll get another wave of progress!



Lockdown Lowdown: was originally published at https://www.fitnessrxformen.com/training/lockdown-lowdown/







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Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions due to COVID-19

As professional sports look to make a phased return behind closed doors across much of Europe, researchers from the University of Bath caution that the prolonged individual training players have been exposed to for months is insufficient to help athletes maintain the physical fitness and mental strength they need for competition. Writing in the International…

As professional sports look to make a phased return behind closed doors across much of Europe, researchers from the University of Bath caution that the prolonged individual training players have been exposed to for months is insufficient to help athletes maintain the physical fitness and mental strength they need for competition.

Writing in the International Journal of Sports Medicine the researchers and sports physicians express their fears that injuries could increase once competitions resume and make recommendations for resuming training.

Most athletes are attempting to overcome the current coronavirus crisis by undertaking individual training within their own four walls to stay fit. But this might not be enough for those involved in contact sports, writes Professor Keith Stokes.

This is because, in addition to physical fitness, such sporting activities require training in evasive manoeuvres and contact situations. It is also near impossible to practice and hone the skills for game strategy when working alone. In addition, the researchers suggest, restrictions imposed on training and games also affects players’ morale, which negatively impacts their mental health.

In the paper the researchers draw parallels with what happened with American football in 2011. Then, the American National Football League had a 20-week lockout when clubs and players could not agree on payment. On returning to competition, injuries were more frequent, especially in the Achilles heel area.

Professor Keith Stokes from the University of Bath’s Department for Health and also England Rugby explains: “After months out of the game, without access to proper training facilities for much of that time, the return to playing matches must be carefully managed.

“Clubs must balance the need to prepare players for high levels of performance, the risk of injury after such a long lay-off, and the risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. The key will be to build appropriate progression into training to give players the safest and most effective possible return.”

In their paper the authors give practical advice on how athletes can protect themselves from injury once they resume sports activities suggesting that:

  • Athletes should work on their individual weaknesses during the period of training restriction.
  • Before return to full training a sports medical examination should be undertaken to inform training progression.
  • Athletes who had COVID-19 themselves should be very carefully managed. Strength and muscle mass might be impacted, but there are also potential impacts of the infection on the heart.
  • Reintroduction to training requires an individualised approach in these athletes.

In addition to their athletic abilities, players’ nutritional condition and mental health may suffer during training restrictions. These two aspects would therefore also have to be taken into account when planning the return to training and games. The authors recommend a high-protein diet, supplemented with vitamins D and C and probiotics as appropriate.

They also point out that forced, abrupt cessation of activity is often even more stressful for athletes than it is for other people. It is common for athletes to develop what is known as “detraining syndrome,” which is characterised by insomnia, anxiety and depression, can have a direct effect on their physical fitness and can delay their resumption of training.

Despite this, the authors are confident that most players will be able to play competitively again after a roughly six-week preparatory period. However, a great deal depends on how long the forced stop of competition has lasted and on what conditions training and games can resume.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Bath. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions due to COVID-19 was originally published at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200706113922.htm