July 13, 2020

Effective Interval Training Workout and More…

In today’s Body Shapr Digest we bring you articles on Effective Interval Training Workout, Physical activity of older people requires tailored monitoring, Calisthenics- A form of training that can change your life! and Hungarian Fitness Model Anita Herbert Talks With Simplyshredded.com. Hope you enjoy them…

Effective Interval Training Workout

Interval training workout can be done in a variety of different ways. Here’s a wickedly-effective type of interval training workout: it requires no machines or fancy equipment, you can do it outside in the sunshine and fresh air, it develops killer conditioning, carves out legs like a sprinter, and burns calories at an accelerated rate……

Interval training workout can be done in a variety of different ways. Here’s a wickedly-effective type of interval training workout: it requires no machines or fancy equipment, you can do it outside in the sunshine and fresh air, it develops killer conditioning, carves out legs like a sprinter, and burns calories at an accelerated rate…

In other articles about running/aerobics and high intensity interval training, as well as in my Fat loss books, I’ve written about how you can integrate both traditional steady state cardio as well as high intensity interval training into your training program for optimal body composition improvement, health and increased fitness – you don’t have to choose one form of cardio or the other. In fact, settling into dogmatic views about cardio will only limit you.

Traditional steady state cardio is pretty much self-explanatory and intuitive. But

interval training workout

many people are still confused about the best way to do interval training workout.

An Insanely Effective Way To Do an interval training workout

I’m not sure if there is a single best way to do intervals because there are so many choices and everyone is different in their goals, interests and personal preferences, so “best” is a relative thing. But let me give you one of my personal favorites that is breathtakingly effective:

Stair sprinting!

Your typical interval training workout in the gym might be on a stationary cycle, treadmill or stairclimber with short 30-60 second bursts of high speed and/or resistance, followed by a 60-120 second period of low intensity recovery. That’s usually a 1:1 or 1:2 work to recovery interval. You then rinse and repeat for the desired number of intervals, usually between 6 and 12.

I sometimes have access to a great set of university stadium steps with a straight shot right up – 52 steps.

Sprinting it takes about 10 seconds or so, walking down about 30 seconds. Those are short intervals with a 1:3 work to recovery interval ratio. That wasn’t by design, it just happens to be how long it takes to run up and walk down that particular flight of stairs, but co-incidentally, that fits within common recommendations for short sprint-style intervals.

I make sure I’m warmed up first, I usually start with a couple flights up at a slow jog then a run, before sprinting, usually 10-12 rounds.

Even if you jog/run instead of sprint, (or pause briefly at the bottom of the stairs), when you do the math, you can figure that this usually doesn’t take more than 10-12 minutes.

Why do I like stadium step sprinting for interval training workout?

  1. Stair sprinting is a time saver. Like other forms of interval training workout, it’s entirely possible to get as much if not more cardiovascular conditioning in 10-15 minutes than you’d get from a much longer session of slower cardio (depending on the intensity and effort levels).
  2. Stair sprinting is engaging. Many people get bored doing long slow to medium intensity cardio sessions. This is a great way to break up the monotony of traditional cardio workouts. Even though it’s tough, it’s actually kind of fun.
  3. Stair sprinting is incredible for leg development. As a bodybuilder, I like to look at all types of training not only in terms of conditioning, fat loss and health, but also whether they will add or detract from the physique. I find that brief but intense stair workouts are amazing for leg development – quads, hamstrings, glutes and even your calves. In fact, I started training on the stairs more than 20 years ago, and I always considered it as much if not more of a leg workout than anything else.
  4. Stair sprinting can be done outside. If you have access to stadium steps, as opposed to just a stairwell, you can enjoy the sun and fresh air.

How to integrate stair running into your interval training workout

If you’re an overachiever type, you might be tempted to do these sprint workouts in addition to your current strength training and cardio workload for a great interval training workout.

However, keep in mind that intensity and duration are inversely proportional. When you do high intensity cardio or all out sprints, you are condensing more work into less time. That means the best part is, you can do a brief but intense stair workout instead of one of your long cardio sessions rather than in addition to them. This is one of the reasons that a interval training workout is so effective.

Recommendation: Start with one session per week, then progress to two if you choose. You can do traditional cardio the other days of the week if you want or need additional calorie-burning. Lower intensity cardio in between training and interval training workout can also serve as active recovery.

Not everyone has access to a full flight of stadium steps, as you might find at a local University. Running flights of stairs in a high rise is another effective and no-cost way to train on stairs. Although you can’t truly sprint with twists and turns on each floor, you can jog/run.

No stairs? Hills will get the job done too and they may provide you with more flexibility in the length/duration of your interval training workout. I’ve found some big hills at just the right grade of incline that I can do 30-45 second runs up, with about 90-120 seconds walk down. Grassy hills are nice, when available, as they spare you some of the impact from running on the concrete.

Running Stairs is Tough but Effective Exercise

Sprinting up stairs is not for everyone doing an interval training workout. If you have a history of health problems or orthopedic issues, check with your doctor before doing any kind of high intensity training and of course, don’t train through the pain of injury. If you are significantly over, it may be a challenge just to walk up stairs, let alone run up, not to mention it might create undue stress on your joints. But as you get lighter and fitter, it’s a challenge you might slowly work toward.

Be sure to build up gradually and adjust the workout based on your current health and fitness level. You could start with as few as 4-6 rounds and build up from there. You can also start with jogging up the stairs, then progress to running, then move to sprints. Be sure you are fully prepared and warmed up before attempting all out sprints as sprinting when unprepared is a notorious source of hamstring pulls.

Stair Training Is Easier on your Body

Some coaches believe that running uphill is safer than sprinting flat surfaces. Writing for Staley Training.com, Coach Steven Morris says, “Another great reason to hill sprint: even an athlete with horrendous running form will be safe running hills. This is simply because the hill does NOT allow the athlete to over-stride nor does it allow them to reach top speed, both major factors in hamstring injuries.”

Stair sprinting is a perfect complement to the cardio portion in my Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle program. If you’re healthy and already fit, try this advanced interval training workout and I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised with the results!

Train hard and expect success!

Tom Venuto, author of
Burn The Fat Feed The Muscle

Founder & CEO of
Burn The Fat Inner Circle

About the Author:

Tom Venuto is the author of the #1 best seller, Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle: Fat Burning Secrets of the World’s Best Bodybuilders and Fitness Models. Tom is a lifetime natural bodybuilder and fat loss expert who achieved an astonishing 3.7% body fat level without drugs or supplements and he totally supports a interval training workout.



Effective Interval Training Workout was originally published at https://www.fitnesstipsforlife.com/effective-interval-training-workout.html






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Physical activity of older people requires tailored monitoring

The ability to move about may deteriorate when ageing, a phenomenon which needs to be considered when assessing physical activity in older people. A study on active ageing at the University of Jyväskylä examined movement that exceeds the intensity of preferred walking speed. Improving physical performance requires exercising regularly beyond one’s usual level of exertion….

The ability to move about may deteriorate when ageing, a phenomenon which needs to be considered when assessing physical activity in older people. A study on active ageing at the University of Jyväskylä examined movement that exceeds the intensity of preferred walking speed.

Improving physical performance requires exercising regularly beyond one’s usual level of exertion. The body then adapts to the new level of exertion by improving performance. Many activity monitors on the market have been developed for young and middle-aged people who have higher physical performance than older adults. Therefore, activity monitors may underestimate the exertion level of older adults’ activity.

In the study at the University of Jyväskylä, preferred walking speed was measured in a six-minute walking test. In addition, the participants wore an activity monitor while living their day-to-day life.

“By measuring their preferred walking speed we were able to assess the time that our participants exercised more strenuously than what is their usual exertion level and what is beyond their comfort zone,” explains postdoctoral researcher Laura Karavirta from the Gerontology Research Center and Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences.

The participants in the study accumulated 62 minutes of activity, on average, beyond the intensity of their preferred walking speed. Interestingly, the amount of activity was similar in 75-, 80- and 85-year-old people, regardless of age.

“The new method enables us to investigate physical activity as individual behaviour, which is not influenced by fitness level,” Karavirta explains. “A physically active lifestyle is about challenging oneself according to one’s own abilities. Light intensity movement is also important, but at least moderate exertion is required for improving physical performance.”

The prevailing recommendation for all adults is a minimum of 150 minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity per week. The general definition for moderate intensity is equivalent to exceeding three times the energy consumption of rest. Individual exertion at this intensity varies according to person’s fitness level.

“For most young adults, it feels easy and corresponds to slow walking but for some older adults it may be the hardest effort they can perform,” Karavirta says.

The study is part of a larger AGNES study for 75-, 80-, and 85-year-old people living independently in Jyväskylä, which is funded by the Academy of Finland and European Research Council. Out of 1,021 participants, 444 took part in this study, where a motion sensor was attached to the thigh for a week and preferred walking speed was measured in the laboratory as the average speed in a self-paced six-minute walking test.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Jyväskylä – Jyväskylän yliopisto. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



Physical activity of older people requires tailored monitoring was originally published at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200708105919.htm







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Calisthenics- A form of training that can change your life!

System Athletica is all about calisthenics training. But what exactly does CALISTHENICS mean and what’s it all about? It’s basically the name given to repetitive exercises that use the resistance of your own body to build strength, increase flexibility and burn body fat.Minimal equipment is needed for calisthenics and can be performed anywhere there is…

System Athletica is all about calisthenics training. But what exactly does CALISTHENICS mean and what’s it all about?

It’s basically the name given to repetitive exercises that use the resistance of your own body to build strength, increase flexibility and burn body fat.
Minimal equipment is needed for calisthenics and can be performed anywhere there is a floor and space. One of the most beneficial aspects of training this way is increased endurance, as with most exercises, you will work almost every muscle in the body. The moves in calisthenics are natural ones that are far better for your joints. Many people who weight train suffer from joint pain because there are exercises that use joints in an unnatural way.

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Personally, this is my favorite style of training. I always feel so good after a System Athletica class. The thousands upon thousands of squats, lunges, knees, glute work, taps and heels that I’ve rep’d out in this class have given me so many benefits.
The strength in my legs are all thanks to this style of training. It’s what strengthened Justin’s knees after suffering pain for many years.
We cannot recommend calisthenics enough!
System Athletica- Mondays 6pm & Wednesdays 9:30am.
Do yourself the biggest favor and add these classes to your training regime.
Your body and your life will change for the absolute better.

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Calisthenics- A form of training that can change your life! was originally published at http://ricogroupfitness.net/new-blog/2020/5/6/calisthenics-a-form-of-training-that-can-change-your-life







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Hungarian Fitness Model Anita Herbert Talks With Simplyshredded.com

How did you get started with bodybuilding? About three years ago, my husband encouraged me to go to the gym for the very first time in my life. At that time, we started training together. It took some time, but he eventually turned me on to eating healthy and weightlifting. As I began to educate…

Quick Stats:

Age: 27
Height: 5’4″ – 163 cm
Weight: 125 lbs – 57 kg

How did you get started with bodybuilding?

About three years ago, my husband encouraged me to go to the gym for the very first time in my life. At that time, we started training together. It took some time, but he eventually turned me on to eating healthy and weightlifting. As I began to educate myself about clean eating and training, I became very interested in this new lifestyle. I loved the way training made me feel, and I also loved seeing how my body was changing day by day. People at the gym started to take notice of how my body was changing too, and they told me that I should compete in a show. At first, I thought it was silly to even consider competing, but then I decided that I should give it a try! Before I knew it, I had five NPC overall wins in a row, and now I’m an IFBB Pro. I just got invited to the Arnold Classic for the first time, and I’m going to be on the Olympia stage in September.

My results didn’t happen overnight; it took a lot of time and patience, but I was very determined, and now fitness has become a way of life for me!

Where does your motivation come from?

My biggest motivation is the mirror. I like to see how my body changes on a daily basis. To me, there is nothing more exciting than discovering a new striation or a new vein popping out on my body! I’m sure some might say that I am crazy, but this has become a lifestyle to me, and I love it! Of course, I have to admit that I like to eat yummy food too, but for me feeling healthy and looking ‘fit’ is far more satisfying than eating a slice of pizza. My life is all about balance, and I can still have a slice of pizza every now and then if I want too, but it just doesn’t interest me as much as it used to.

I honestly also get a lot of excitement and motivation from all of the positive feedback that I receive through my large social media following.

What workout routine has worked best for you?

I switch up my training every once in a while, so it doesn’t get boring. I also like to do aerobic classes and outdoor boot camps too! And on Sunday which is my rest day, I still like to do some form of cardio.

Full Routine:

Monday: Glutes

  • Smith Machine Squats 4 x 15
  • Leg Press 4 x 12
  • Kettle Bell Sumo Squats 4 x 12
  • Smith Machine Hip Thrusts 4 x12

Tuesday: Hamstrings/Calves

  • Lying Leg Curls 4 x 12
  • Standing Leg Curls 4 x 15
  • Deadlifts 4 x 12
  • Hip Abductor 4 x 20
  • Standing Calve Raises 5 x 20

Wednesday: Shoulders

  • Lateral Raises 4 x 10
  • Shoulder Press 4 x 15
  • Front Cable Raises 4 x 12
  • Rear Delt Fly’s 4 x 15

Thursday: Back

  • Pull Ups 4 x 10
  • Wide Grip Pulldowns 3 x 12
  • Close Grip Pulldowns 3 x 12
  • Seated Cable Row 4 x 15
  • Back Extensions 4 x 20

Friday: Arms

  • Overhead Cable Extensions 4 x 15
  • Skull Crushers 4 x 12
  • Cable Kickbacks 4 x 12
  • Dumbbell Curls 4 x 15
  • Cable Curls 4 x 15

Saturday: Chest/Abs

  • Dumbbell Fly’s 4 x 15
  • Push Ups 4 x 20
  • Hanging Leg Raises 4 x 20
  • Crunches 4 x 20
  • Planks 4 x 1 min

Sunday: Rest

If you had to pick only 3 exercises what would they be and why?

  1. Squats: Squats are great because my booty can never be big enough. (Laughs)
  2. Hanging Leg Raises: I love abs and hanging leg raises seem to work the best for me. Plus living in Miami, Florida, I always have to be bikini ready! (Laughs)
  3. Lateral Raises: I love training my shoulders with lateral raises because I love to feel the burn in my shoulders.

What is your diet like?

I have two diets that I stay very consistent with. One diet I use for my off season and the other diet I use for preparing for a competition. When I’m prepping for a competition, my diet is very strict. I consume six meals a day; I measure everything, and I absolutely have no cheats! My protein sources primarily come from chicken, fish and eggs. My carbs consist of oats, quinoa, brown rice and sweet potato. I also love all kinds of vegetables, and I incorporate them into my diet as well. During my prep, I also limit my sodium intake, and I drink one to two gallons of water per day. Off season my diet is more flexible, but I still try to eat five to six meals a day. But in off season, I am able to include one to two cheat meals a week.

Daily Diet:

  • Meal 1: ½ cup Oats, 4 Egg Whites and ½ cup Berries
  • Meal 2: 4 ounces Chicken, ½ cup Sweet Potatoes and 1 cup Asparagus
  • Meal 3: 1 scoop Protein, ½ Banana and 1 tablespoon Peanut Butter
  • Meal 4: 4 ounces Turkey, ½ cup Quinoa and 1 cup Vegetables
  • Meal 5: 3 ounces Salmon and 1 small Salad
  • Meal 6: 1 scoop Casein

What’s the one food you couldn’t live without, and how do you handle food cravings?

I couldn’t live without my peanut butter; it’s peanut butter all of the way! (Laughs) And not just peanut butter, I love all kinds of nut butters too. I can’t keep peanut butter in my house anymore because I just can’t control myself. Last year, during contest prep, my friend gave me a big jar of peanut butter.

My husband had to lock the peanut butter in his safe to keep it away from me, and it’s a safe that only can be opened with his fingerprint! I guess it’s safe to say, I’m nuts for nuts!

What is your supplementation like?

  • BCAA’s
  • Glutamine
  • L-Carnitine
  • Fish Oil
  • Flaxseed Oil
  • CLA’s

What do you love most about living in Miami, Florida? And what do you recommend is a ‘must see’ if someone comes for a visit?

I just absolutely love the Florida heat! I grew up in Hungary, and I had to endure twenty three extremely cold winters. Miami Beach is beautiful, and it’s fun to ‘people watch’ on Ocean Drive.

Lincoln Road has good shopping and great restaurants, and pool parties are a lot of fun too!

Favorite Quote:

“Everyone wants to be a diamond, but very few are willing to get cut”

Social Media

Instagram: @anita_herbert
Facebook: facebook.com/AnitaHerbertfitness/



Hungarian Fitness Model Anita Herbert Talks With Simplyshredded.com was originally published at http://simplyshredded.com/hungarian-fitness-model-anita-herbert-talks-with-simplyshredded-com.html