July 21, 2020

Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique  and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique , Book An Online Experience With An Olympian This Wednesday, Sculpt Strong Shoulders With Dumbbell Raises and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson & Dany Garcia Partner With Mr. Olympia To Showcase The Fitness And…. Hope you enjoy them…

Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique 

Most fighters are the epitome of a human body. Not only do they look incredible, with chiseled muscles, but they also perform on a world-class level. They have the strength and conditioning that some can only dream of, even for other athletes. When it comes to fighting, you can’t be all endurance or all strength,…

Most fighters are the epitome of a human body. Not only do they look incredible, with chiseled muscles, but they also perform on a world-class level. They have the strength and conditioning that some can only dream of, even for other athletes. When it comes to fighting, you can’t be all endurance or all strength, you have to be able to possess both strength and endurance in a perfect balancing act, or rather a dance, between the two. 

Eating Like a Fighter

The first thing you will have to do is change things up in the kitchen. In order for your muscles to show, you will have to lose the excess body fat and fighters go through the same regimen when cutting weight for a fight. It’s definitely much more involved in losing weight than just their training routine.

The only difference between fighters and the typical fitness junkie is that they treat it more simple rather than counting their macros and micros. For the most part, they eat about 5 fist-sized meals, or about 1,500-2,800 calories a day (depending on the weight class the fighter). As far as what they eat, its 70% whole foods, mostly vegetables  and lean proteins like fish and chicken. 

The Workout 

While boxers train about 6-8 hours a day, it doesn’t mean you have to. Instead, you want to focus on the exercises that are most efficient and borrow from their workout. 

 

Strength Training 

For strength, training boxers stick to calisthenics and very few lift weights. This is because bulky muscles will slow them down and require more oxygen. They have to have both lung and muscle endurance, so their strength training has to be endurance-focused, which means high reps calisthenics. 

Here is what you would do in a circuit. 

100-200 pushups 
50-100 Pullups 
100-200 squats 
100 Situps 
50 Leg Raises

Do this in a circuit with one-minute breaks, or one exercise to completion, followed by the next 

All these workouts have a strong focus on the core because fighters have to be strong in the body in order to have strong punches and to be able to take punches. For you, it will help you in all of your exercises by building explosiveness and giving you more muscle endurance. 

This workout will burn calories and build muscle. It’s a perfect mix of cardio and strength training.

Heavy Bag Workout

One of the most fun workouts that you will ever do is a heavy bag. This requires you to put on gloves and punching the bag for 3 minutes, 1-minute breaks, for 3 to 5 rounds depending on what you can take. This workout will help develop your core, your lats, your shoulders, and your endurance. You will most likely look like you went for a swim after four rounds because you will be drenched. 

Jumping Rope 

Many people scoff at jump roping as a kids exercise. When in reality it can burn way more calories than running per minute. It’s one of the most efficient fat burning exercises that you can partake in. Boxer’s do it because it’s an efficient way to cut weight, it works your shoulders and mostly calves like no other workout there is. Just ten minutes of rope jumping can burn well over 120 calories. 

Try it for a Month 

Nothing works if you don’t try it. Give this workout a shot for 30 days and see how you feel and watch your body change for the better. It will help you improve both in and out of the gym due to the extra endurance. Make sure to get your rest but go at least 5 days a week, in any format. Try it and let us know how your body has changed. 



Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique  was originally published at https://www.fitnessandpower.com/training/workout-routines/get-a-fighter-physique






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Book An Online Experience With An Olympian This Wednesday

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics were due to begin this Friday, but the postponement has left Olympians, Paralympians and spectators in limbo. To help fill that void Airbnb has collaborated with the Olympic and Paralympic committees to host the five-day Summer Festival, offering unique online experiences with a host of athletes. The festival begins this Friday…

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics were due to begin this Friday, but the postponement has left Olympians, Paralympians and spectators in limbo. To help fill that void Airbnb has collaborated with the Olympic and Paralympic committees to host the five-day Summer Festival, offering unique online experiences with a host of athletes.

The festival begins this Friday 24th July, with bookings going live on Wednesday 22nd July. The proceeds from this rare opportunity to meet inspiring figures will go to athletes, giving them the chance to generate income from their talent and experience.

While the final line-up is subject to change, we’ve been teased the chance to go on a scenic training ride with triathlete Jonny Brownlee and try a cook-along with former hurdler Colin Jackson.

There will also be the opportunity to discover how some Olympians train, with tennis players Naomi Osaka (Japan) and Sania Mirza (India) pulling the curtain back on their regimes, as well as the chance to join in and sweat along. There’s Zumba on the beach with retired pole vaulter Tom Hintnaus (Brazil) and an inclusive workout with Paralympian wheelchair racer Tatyana McFadden (USA).

Many sessions will zero in on mindset, with athletes discussing the mental qualities that are as essential to sporting success as physical prowess. Wheelchair tennis player and Paralympic medallist Lucy Shuker, pictured, will speak on the importance of sports psycology. Swimmer Yusra Mardini, part of the first IOC Refugee Olympic Team, will be discussing resilience, marathon runner Meb Keflezighi (USA) will talk pushing through boundaries, while hero of both Summer and Winter Olympics Pita Taufatofua (Tonga) focuses on perseverance and three-time beach volleyball champ Kerri Walsh Jennings (USA) explores the relationship between vulnerability and greatness.

While there are no confirmed prices for festival experiences, some Olympians are hosting sessions already: costs range from £7 to £36 and events last between 60 and 90 minutes. Most viewing groups are limited to ten people, small enough that you can be sure you’ll be able to pepper each athlete with questions.

Set an alarm and start browsing what’s on offer as soon as you wake up on Wednesday.



Book An Online Experience With An Olympian This Wednesday was originally published at https://www.coachmag.co.uk/sport/8638/book-an-online-experience-with-an-olympian-this-wednesday







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Sculpt Strong Shoulders With Dumbbell Raises

The shoulder is the most complex joint in the body. It has a small ball and socket joint that’s very unstable and it’s literally held in place by muscles and tendons. Thus, it’s not surprising that the shoulder is vulnerable to injury. On the other hand, shoulder instability provides a mechanism for enormous movement possibilities…

The shoulder is the most complex joint in the body. It has a small ball and socket joint that’s very unstable and it’s literally held in place by muscles and tendons. Thus, it’s not surprising that the shoulder is vulnerable to injury. On the other hand, shoulder instability provides a mechanism for enormous movement possibilities so that we can freely manipulate our environment. Shoulder injury can be avoided, however, if the soft tissue structures that support the joint are strong and not overly stretched (i.e., torn).

Form and Function

The functions at the shoulder include rotation, flexion and extension. Depending on which fibers and muscles are active, the shoulder is capable of medial and lateral rotation, flexion (bringing the arm forward) and extension (bringing the arm backward) of the humerus bone.

Deltoid muscle. The deltoid is a thick, powerful, muscle that caps the other muscles of the shoulder joint, and covers the bony connections that make up the shoulder. The deltoid is thought of as three muscles each having a different head. Although they are not truly separate heads, the deltoid originates from three regions on the bony portions of the shoulder and has several functions.

The anterior fibers begin along the lateral part of the clavicle (collarbone). The posterior fibers attach along the spine of the scapula (shoulder blade). The medial fibers begin in regions between the previous two sites on the acromion of the scapula. All fibers from the deltoid converge on the anterior and upper portion of the humerus bone called the deltoid tuberosity. This is a bumpy part almost halfway between the shoulder and elbow on the lateral aspect of the humerus bone of the upper arm.

Rotator Cuff Muscles

Four scapular muscles (subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor) form the rotator cuff muscles and fulfill many of the movements associated with the shoulder. All but the supraspinatus are rotators of the humerus at the shoulder.

Infraspinatus and Teres Minor. The infraspinatus muscle fills most of the infraspinatus fossa and attaches between this fossa and the greater tubercle of the humerus. Its function is to rotate the humerus laterally. The teres minor muscle attaches between the superior (upper) part of the lateral border of the scapula and the greater tubercle of the humerus. It laterally rotates the humerus and helps stabilize the shoulder joint.

Supraspinatus. The supraspinatus is a rounded muscle that lies in a hollowed out area on the top part of the posterior side of the scapula. It begins near the medial side of the scapula and runs over to the superior part of the head of the humerus. It lies deep to the trapezius muscle and part of it is also deep to the coracromial arch (strong ligaments connecting the coracoid process of the scapula to the acromion – the end part of the spine of the scapula. The tendon of the supraspinatus is covered by the deltoid. Along with the lateral fibers of the deltoid, the supraspinatus acts to abduct the humerus (raise the arm to the side with a straight elbow). It’s the only muscle of the rotator cuff that doesn’t have a rotational function.

Subscapularis. Unlike the other muscles of the rotator cuff, this muscle lives exclusively on the front (anterior) side of the scapula. It crosses the anterior part of the shoulder joint and inserts on the lesser tubercle of the humerus. This muscle is a strong medial rotator of the humerus.

Potential For Injury

If you lift your arms to a position over your head, the head of your humerus bone moves laterally as it is forced inferiorly. This tends to stretch the supraspinatus muscle. Too much stretch, however, can cause small tears in the muscle and its tendinous attachments. This results in shoulder pain, swelling and frequently tendinitis. The supraspinatus will develop microtears that may lead to more substantial tears and swelling in the soft tissue. Thus, heavy or explosive lifts (or even fast descents) may result in the muscle becoming damaged. It’s not just direct shoulder exercises that could damage the rotator cuff and other shoulder muscles; just about any upper body exercise has some potential for such injury. The solution is to make sure all aspects of the shoulder and rotator cuff are strong.

During everyday movement, the rotator cuff muscles, especially the supraspinatus, are susceptible to repeated microtramuas and small microscopic tears. Usually, the source of micro-damage is impingement (pinching) against the coracromial arch when the shoulder joint is abducted or flexed.

Because there’s not much space in the area below the acromion arch, the subacromial bursa is critical to smooth and pain free shoulder movements. Excessive abduction of the arm at the shoulder joint can cause inflammation of the bursa, or bursitis. Bursitis of the subacromial bursae occurs because it becomes inflamed after being pinched and compressed during sliding movements of the supraspinatus and other tendons across it.

Alternating Front and Lateral Dumbbell Raise

Improvements of the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles can be achieved by the following combination of two dumbbell exercises. The first part is a lateral raise from the side of your thighs to shoulder level. The second is to arch the dumbbell from the side to finish at about eye level in front of your body.

  1. First, warm up the shoulder with some stretching, then a set or two (e.g., 15-20 repetitions) of light dumbbell presses. Start with elbows pointed to the floor with arms adjacent on the corresponding lateral sides of the rib cage. Palms should be pronated (facing toward the rear). Press the dumbbells upward, but after a couple of inches as you reach eye level, begin to press the dumbbells so they’re in a line in front of your face rather than directly over your head. The dumbbells should come together but not quite touch at the top of the movement. This is like an “A,” with a wider position at the start and finishing at the apex. Continue pressing upward; at the top of the movement your elbows should be bent and pointing to the sides at about ear level. Don’t straighten your elbows.
  2. Slowly lower the weight to the starting position and reverse the movements by bringing your elbows back to the lateral side of the rib cage. Now you’re ready for the real thing. Begin with a dumbbell in each hand and your arms hanging straight beside your torso. Each dumbbell should be turned so your palm faces toward the side of your thigh. Your elbows should be just short of straight, but the elbow joint angle should not change throughout the range of motion. Your feet should be wide enough to provide a good base of support.
  3. Lean slightly forward, but make sure your lower back and gluteal muscles are tight and your knees are slightly bent to reduce unnecessary lower back movement or strain. Keep elbows slightly bent and raise the dumbbells to a position slightly above shoulder level.
  4. Do not lift the dumbbell higher than parallel to the floor. The deltoid does not contract any further once you reach the parallel position, but other muscles (e.g., serratus anterior, trapezius) do contract to allow you to rotate the scapula to bring the arm above a position parallel to the floor. Lifting the weight higher puts more stretch/stress on the supraspinatus muscle without benefit.
  5. As the top position is approached, rotate each shoulder so the knuckles of the little fingers are pointing upward. This “twist” will be produced by a medial rotation at the shoulder joint and not at the wrist. Hold this top position for a count of two to isometrically contract the deltoid. This extra rotation will also bring the anterolateral region of the deltoid into play (fibers between the lateral and anterior regions) and thereby thicken the tie-in between these two regions of the deltoid).
  6. Now begin the descent with the weight as you slowly rotate your shoulders laterally. This will result in a slight supination of your hands. Then return the dumbbells slowly to the starting position with the dumbbells on the lateral side of your thighs and your hands pronated (palm facing away from your face toward the rear).
  7. From this position, start upward again, but this time move the dumbbells in front of your body instead of keeping them at the side. Your elbows should remain slightly bent to avert unnecessary shearing forces, but prevent your elbow angle from changing throughout the movement.
  8. Raise the dumbbells in an arc from the starting lateral position to finish at, or slightly below, eye level. As you raise your arms and dumbbells, rotate your shoulders so your little finger is facing upward, just as you did for the lateral raise. This time though, you’ll feel the muscle contraction more anteriorly in the shoulder. After you reach the top, begin the descent back to a position with the dumbbells on either side of the lateral aspects of your thighs.
  9. Repeat the sequence without resting until the set is complete (e.g., 8-10 lateral raises alternated with 8-10 front raises). After each set, swing your arms back and forth to attempt to get as much blood to the shoulders as possible.

Position, Speed and Resistance 

Arm and elbow position. Elbows should point away from your torso throughout. This position favors activation of the medial fibers of the deltoid and simultaneously stretches the anterior fibers of the deltoid to improve mechanical activation. Most of the safe and effective work for the rotator cuff and deltoid is complete by the time the upper arms have become parallel to the floor, so it’s never necessary or desirable to raise your arms much beyond this point. Keep the anterior deltoids under constant tension; don’t relax with your arms hanging at your sides between repetitions.

Wrist position. Lock the wrist so all the rotation movement occurs at the shoulder joint. If you allow the wrists to rotate, this will drastically decrease the effectiveness of the exercise.

Velocity of movement. Avoid jerking or explosively lifting the dumbbells in a lateral raise because this would almost certainly result in tears of the supraspinatus. Don’t rotate the shoulder in a jerky or ballistic manner, especially when you’re medially rotating the arm at the shoulder joint. This would likely result in microtears in the subscapularis muscle followed by significant shoulder pain.

Resistance. Extremely heavy weights can cause further joint instability and increase   injury risk, particularly if exercises are done quickly or under extreme ranges of motion. You still must be willing to work hard and intensely; however, you must also work intelligently. Warming up a joint with light weight is important.

Remember, the shoulder joint is literally held together by its muscle attachments, not other bones. Thus, stronger shoulder muscles mean greater shoulder stability and reduced risks for injury.

References:
Basmajian JV. Recent advances in the functional anatomy of the upper limb. Am J Phys Med, 48:165, 1969.
Basmajian JV and CJ Deluca. Muscles Alive. 5th Edition. Baltimore, Williams and Wilkins, pp. 220-224, 1985.
Clemente CD. Anatomy, A regional atlas of the human body. Second edition, Baltimore, Urban & Schwarzenberg Pub. Co. p.33-75, 1981.
Codine P, Bernard PL, et al. Influence of sports discipline on shoulder rotator cuff balance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 29(11):1400-5, 1997.
Doody S G, L Freedman and JC Waterland. Shoulder movements during abduction in the scapular plane. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 51:595, 1970.
Freedman L and RR Munro. Abduction of the arm in the scapular plane. Scapular andglenohumeral movements. A Roentgenographic study. J Bone Joint Surg, 48A:1053, 1966.
Kestens B, Hoogmartens M. The hung up shoulder: anterior subluxation locking in abduction. Acta Orthopaedica Belgica, 63(3):165-9, 1997.
Kuechle DK. Newman SR et al. Shoulder muscle moment arms during horizontal flexion and elevation. Journal of Shoulder & Elbow Surgery, 6(5):429-39, 1997.
Moore KL and AM Agur. Essential Clinically Anatomy, Williams and Wilkins, 1995.
Netter FH. Atlas of Human Anatomy, 2nd Edition, Frank H. Netter, Ciba-Geigy, 1997.
Nelson CL. Athletic injuries of the shoulder. Cleveland Clin Quart, 40:27, 1973.
Penny JN and PP Welsh. Shoulder impingement syndromes in athletes and their surgical management. Am J Sports Med, 9:11, 1981.
Rasch PJ. Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy. Seventh edition. Philadelphia, London. Lea & Febiger, pp. 117-135, 1989.
Saha AK. Dynamic stability of the glenohumeral joint. Acta Orthop Scand, 42:491, 1971.

source

Sculpt Strong Shoulders With Dumbbell Raises was originally published at https://www.fitnessrxwomen.com/training/sculpt-strong-shoulders-with-dumbbell-raises/







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Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson & Dany Garcia Partner With Mr. Olympia To Showcase The Fitness And…

Seven Bucks Productions, co-founded by Dwayne Johnson and Dany Garcia, is partnering with Mr. Olympia, LLC, a division of American Media Inc. (AMI), to bring bodybuilding center stage. The production company, responsible for hits like HBO’s Ballers, the documentary film Rock and a Hard Place and the upcoming Baywatch movie, will first taken on Mr….

Seven Bucks Productions, co-founded by Dwayne Johnson and Dany Garcia, is partnering with Mr. Olympia, LLC, a division of American Media Inc. (AMI), to bring bodybuilding center stage.

The production company, responsible for hits like HBO’s Ballers, the documentary film Rock and a Hard Place and the upcoming Baywatch movie, will first taken on Mr. Olympia Weekend, the premier event in the sport of bodybuilding.

“This big boy never had dreams of stepping onto the MR. OLYMPIA stage, but ever since I was 14yrs old, I valued one core fundamental belief which is my success is directly tied to my WILL to push myself and work hard in the weight room daily,” Johnson wrote on Facebook. “And that WILL in people is what we want to showcase to the world. Whether you’re an amateur athlete, pro athlete or weekend warrior – male or female – all ages – it all starts and ends with what we accomplish in the weight room. This’ll be fun!”

The Rock along with Garcia, one of the country’s top female professional bodybuilders, will join Mr. Olympia on the road to Mr. Olympia Weekend, which will be held September 15-18 in Las Vegas, Nev.

“This is a passion project for not only myself but the entire Seven Bucks Production family. We are absolutely thrilled to have the opportunity to highlight an event that that has shaped the world of bodybuilding and touches every aspect of the fitness community. We are committed to working with AMI to bring the greatest level of showmanship and entertainment to the athletes, audience and viewers,” said Garcia.

“Seven Bucks Productions, Dwayne Johnson and Dany Garcia are a committed, dedicated and creative force in the entertainment industry,” said AMI Chairman and CEO David J. Pecker. “The Mr. Olympia weekend has continued to grow in size, attendance and excitement leading up to last year’s record-setting event featuring the largest competitive purse in the sport. Combining the passion, creativity and incredible knowledge of the sport that Dwayne and Dany possess with the momentum of the event ensures that the 2016 Mr. Olympia will be the most exciting in its 50-year history.”



Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson & Dany Garcia Partner With Mr. Olympia To Showcase The Fitness And… was originally published at http://radaronline.com/exclusives/2016/02/dwayne-the-rock-johnson-partners-mr-olympia-fitness-bodybuilding-industry/