August 15, 2020

Get Stronger With This Full-Body TRX Workout and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Get Stronger With This Full-Body TRX Workout, College Coach Spotlight: Sara Slattery, What Keeps Me Running – Women’s Running and The 2 Essential Supplements for a Plant-Based Diet. Hope you enjoy them…

Get Stronger With This Full-Body TRX Workout

If you invested in a suspension trainer during the COVID-19 lockdown then congratulations, you’ve picked up one of the most versatile bits of home fitness equipment you can get. Suspension trainers allow you to increase the difficulty of moves as your fitness improves and they can be incorporated into a variety of workouts, including HIIT …

If you invested in a suspension trainer during the COVID-19 lockdown then congratulations, you’ve picked up one of the most versatile bits of home fitness equipment you can get. Suspension trainers allow you to increase the difficulty of moves as your fitness improves and they can be incorporated into a variety of workouts, including HIIT and Pilates sessions.

This TRX workout will develop your strength and has been put together by Ria Gandhi, a personal trainer at Core Collective, a chain of three studios in London that offers group TRX classes.

Full-Body TRX Workout

Section 1

For this first part of the workout you’ll be using the short strap and performing exercises for a defined period of time. The section starts with three lower-body moves then goes into an upper-body superset. Complete two rounds of the following five moves, then take a one-minute rest before starting the second section.

1 Double pulse squat

Time 45sec Rest 15sec

Stand facing the anchor point with your feet hip-width apart, holding the handles lightly with a slight bend in your elbows. Focus on a slow eccentric (downward) phase with the squat, with a slight pause and double pulse at the bottom to add time under tension, then drive up through your heels, squeezing your glutes at the top.

2 Pistol squat

Time 45sec Rest 15sec

Stand facing the anchor point, ensuring there is no slack in the straps as you hold them. Lower on one leg while simultaneously extending the other leg straight out in front of you. Once again, focus on a slow eccentric phase and drive up through the heel. Alternate legs with each rep.

3 Jump squat

Time 30sec Rest 30sec

Stand facing the anchor point with your feet hip-width apart. Lower into a squat, then explode upwards so your feet leave the floor. Land softly and pause briefly, then go into another squat.

4A Supinated row

Time 30sec Rest 0sec

Hold the handles with your palms facing up and walk your feet underneath the TRX – the closer to horizontal you are, the more resistance you’ll add. Pull your torso up, keeping your core braced. Lower slowly back to the start position to add time under tension.

4B Hand release press-up

Time 30sec Rest 30sec

Leave the ropes be for this exercise, or extend the straps and put your feet into the handles if you want an extra challenge. Get into a high plank position with your shoulders over your wrists. Lower to the floor with control, ensuring your hips and shoulders are in line and your elbows are tucked in. Take your hands off the floor at the bottom, then push back up.

Section 2

The second part of the workout is made up of unilateral exercises where you challenge one side at a time. Work through four rounds of the following two exercises, alternating working your left side, then your right. Again, you’ll need to set up the TRX with a short strap.

1 Pistol squat

Time 45sec Rest 15sec

As above.

2 Jump split squat

Time 30sec Rest 30sec

Stand facing the anchor point, holding the handles with your palms facing. Tuck your elbows in to your sides and get into a split stance with your weight on the front foot and your back heel raised. Lower slowly, keeping tension in the quads of the front leg, and then drive up, exploding off your front heel and fully extending your back leg.

Get Stronger With This Full-Body TRX Workout was originally published at https://www.coachmag.co.uk/full-body-workouts/8666/get-stronger-with-this-full-body-trx-workout

College Coach Spotlight: Sara Slattery

From early in her running career, Sara Slattery had outstanding coaches. At Mountain Pointe High School in Phoenix, former pro runner Sabrina Robinson guided her to 10 state championships—and trained alongside her as a master, making the 2000 Olympic Marathon Trials at age 42. “She wasn’t afraid of barriers in terms of gender or age,” …

From early in her running career, Sara Slattery had outstanding coaches.

At Mountain Pointe High School in Phoenix, former pro runner Sabrina Robinson guided her to 10 state championships—and trained alongside her as a master, making the 2000 Olympic Marathon Trials at age 42.

“She wasn’t afraid of barriers in terms of gender or age,” Slattery says. “She pushed the envelope. I learned a lot from that.”

Then, Slattery ran at Colorado University under the legendary Mark Wetmore. There, she was a four-time NCAA champion, 10-time Big 12 champion and 10-time All-American—and observed how Wetmore instilled confidence in athletes.

When Slattery went on to run professionally, she struggled to find a situation that worked for her. “There just wasn’t the coaching structure out there; there weren’t the groups and other options like there are now,” she says. “That’s where I realized how important coaching really is.”

Now, she’s entering her sixth year of filling that critical role for the next generation. At the small but up-and-coming GCU, she’s built a program from nearly the ground up. Taking lessons from her early influences, Slattery has perfected her own style and never stopped learning along the way.

From Water to Land

Slattery started off a swimmer. From age 8 on, she dreamed of representing the University of Michigan, whose accomplished aquatic athletes include Michael Phelps. But her running talent showed early, when she beat all her classmates except for one boy in the timed mile in P.E.

Her freshman year at Mountain Pointe, she ran track over the objections of her swim coach—and placed second in the state in the 800 meters and two-mile. From there, she decided to pursue her potential on the track and roads instead of in the pool.

During her professional career, Slattery had sponsorships from both Adidas and Nike; won gold in the 10,000 meters at the 2007 Pan American Games in Rio de Janeiro; served as an alternate for the 5,000 meters at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing; and won the Bolder Boulder 10K in 2006.

Sara Slattery coaching
Photo: Courtesy Sara Slattery

Stepping Into Leadership

Slattery got her first taste on the other side of the stopwatch while she was still a pro runner. On the side, she worked with Ric Rojas—the first-ever Bolder Boulder winner and father of this year’s ninth-place Olympic Marathon Trials finisher Nell Rojas—to coach a group of corporate employees of WhiteWave Foods.

In 2013, she and her husband Steve moved to Phoenix. She started both a family and the South Mountain Striders, a training group for moms looking to regain their fitness. “I wanted to get into coaching somehow, and it was a way that—with the kids—I could still do something,” she says. “I really loved it.”

After she had her second child, Cali, Slattery got a phone call she wasn’t expecting. Tom Flood, the head coach from nearby Grand Canyon University, was on the other end of the line. His head distance coach had resigned. Would Slattery consider the position?

Though she loved coaching, Slattery hesitated. Not only was she a new mom again, she still had big goals for her own running: She planned to run the Olympic Trials in the marathon and on the track in 2016.

Flood persisted. He promised to make the position work for her. Practice required her attendance, but otherwise, she could work from home and continue prioritizing her own training and family. Slattery ultimately couldn’t pass up the opportunity to coach in her hometown, for a distance program that was just getting started.

Small Steps and Big Goals

For all its elasticity, the role was still demanding. When she started, GCU was moving from Division II to Division I, which meant the team couldn’t go to regional or national competitions for the first two years. Recruiting high-caliber athletes with that restriction was challenging. “I had to learn to sell myself and sell what we were trying to do with the future of the program,” she says.

Marketing was just one of the many skill sets she had to develop. “It’s almost like running a small business as a head coach,” she says. “There’s so many little facets—the recruiting, creating the team and the culture, the training, all the administrative stuff within the athletic department. You learn a lot.”

When it comes to the culture, Slattery has a clear vision of what she’s trying to build: an atmosphere like the one she had in college, where she made bonds that are intact to this day.

“I tell my athletes, your teammates become your family away from your family,” she says. “You count on each other. You’re not going to get along with everybody all the time, but you respect each other and you try to help make each other better.”

Of course, competition matters too. Already, Slattery has guided Paige Hildebrandt to the school’s first Western Athletic Conference title in the 3000-meter steeplechase.

Of the 10 conference titles the GCU ’Lopes have won on the track, “we’ve contributed a lot on the distance side and gotten better each year,” Slattery says. “We’re finally getting to the point where we have a shot of winning conference titles as a cross-country program and I’m taking kids to nationals.”

Her big goal is to take a whole cross-country team to NCAA Nationals, something she knows might take a few more years to achieve. Beginning this fall, she’ll have a little more help: Hana Hall, the daughter of Olympian Ryan Hall and current elite runner Sara Hall, is now part of her team.

College Coach Spotlight: Sara Slattery was originally published at http://ow.ly/kvRG50AYZ4G

What Keeps Me Running – Women’s Running

It took me 27 years to even begin to consider myself a runner.  Which didn’t make a whole lot of sense, seeing as I grew up a very active athlete. I played a handful of sports from a young age, and all but one (swimming) required running. But calling myself a “runner” always felt like …

 

It took me 27 years to even begin to consider myself a runner.

Which didn’t make a whole lot of sense, seeing as I grew up a very active athlete. I played a handful of sports from a young age, and all but one (swimming) required running. But calling myself a “runner” always felt like a title I had yet to earn.

Part of that root cause was pretty easy to trace: I didn’t run my first 10K and half marathon until a few years out of college. I trained hard and loved the experiences, but it wasn’t like my time was super impressive or anything. It didn’t seem like enough to earn the distinction.

And then, just a few months later, I got hurt. In the year following my ACL and meniscus reconstruction, I began to doubt that I would ever get back to my previous fitness level, much less surpass it. This is your new normal, I thought. I didn’t recognize it as being negative; I simply thought I was being realistic. So, I had started to stop believing I would ever check the  box on my bucket list labeled “Run a marathon.”

But the thing is, I’ve never been the type to sit on the sidelines. I wasn’t the most naturally gifted athlete, but that didn’t stop me from earning a D-1 collegiate lacrosse scholarship. I left my small Ohio town to pursue a career in the competitive magazine business, and I realized that dream—in cutthroat New York City.

In every area of my life—career, relationships, sports—I’ve done what Sheryl Sandberg asked of all women in 2010, in her TED Talk-turned-book-turned-social-movement: I’ve Leaned In. I’ve been confident. Except, that is, when it came to running.

That’s when it hit me: Knee surgery might have sidelined me, but it was my mindset that was keeping me there. Physically I had healed, but psychologically I was more bruised up than ever. Without ever realizing it, I had settled. I was still a glass-half-full optimist who believed anything was possible, but I guess somewhere along the way I started thinking that rule pertained to everyone but me.

When I was given the chance to train for my first big race, I knew I was willing to follow a tough training plan. I knew I had a great support system. Truly the only thing holding me back was the fearful voice in the back of my mind saying, ‘But what if you fail?’ 

Cue Sandberg’s belief that women underestimate their own potential. While athletic ability is often measured by how well our muscles, heart, and lungs function, what’s above the neck (a.k.a. our brain) may play a bigger role in both propelling and limiting performance. “Fear and doubt can either make us assume we aren’t capable of doing something or trick us into thinking we don’t really want it,” says Carrie Cheadle, co-author of Rebound: Train Your Mind to Bounce Back Stronger from Sports Injuries. Why? “It can feel very vulnerable putting everything you have on the line and finding out it’s still not enough—so we hold back. We unconsciously set an easier goal to protect our ego.”

Those insecurities can spike when you’re two miles into a five-mile run and you simply Can’t. Take. One. More. Step. “Your brain is designed to play it safe,” says Timothy Noakes, M.D., a professor of exercise and sports science at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. “You may never know your true limit because your brain is that good at deceiving you into thinking that you can’t possibly go any faster, harder, or longer.”

When you spend time far outside your comfort zone, running becomes so much more than just exercise. Months of training definitely made a physical impact, and I won’t pretend that’s not a perk. But all I could seem to focus on was how it had affected my outlook, not my body. Every minute on the course I was in the complete unknown, but instead of feeling intimidated, I was energized. I was grateful. I was hopeful. As I crossed the finish line, I was hit with an indescribable surge of pride. Tears rolled down my face. I just did that, I thought. I can’t believe I just did that. I had been so worried about failing that I never considered the alternative: I might succeed beyond my wildest dreams.

“An ambitious fitness goal is really just the vehicle to show people how awesome they are,” says Robyn Benincasa, founder of Project Athena, which helps women who have had serious medical setbacks live out adventurous dreams as part of their recovery. “The thrill of accomplishing a physical feat that very few people are able to do inspires a confidence and satisfaction that spills over into every aspect of our lives.”

Crossing that finish line changed the way I looked at myself forever. It helped me win back my own confidence and prove I was still capable of anything I set my mind to. But it also made me wonder in what other ways I might be holding myself back. From that point on, running became a personal litmus test. I kept training, kept checking off races. I was never the best or the fastest, but each training block helped me find a better version of myself.

And just when I felt I was hitting my rhythm, 2020 hit. And, like many other runners, my big goals and plans were canceled. But without races and formal finish lines, I’ve realized even more how running isn’t about the accomplishment itself. It’s about pushing yourself just a little bit past your comfort zone. It’s about hearing “I can’t,” but showing yourself you can. Some days this year, that’s just a few minutes or a few miles. But it doesn’t matter.

Because this year has taught me that I don’t run to chase finish lines. I don’t run to collect medals or break records. I don’t run because it comes easy or because it’s what all my friends do. I run because it’s the one thing that continually and instantly renews my belief that no matter how I feel, I’m not stuck. That no matter what might be happening—in my life, in the world, or even just in those miles—I can always find a way to move myself forward.

What Keeps Me Running – Women’s Running was originally published at http://ow.ly/Y5G850AYYXy

The 2 Essential Supplements for a Plant-Based Diet

If you’ve hopped on the plant-based diet bandwagon and given up meat, dairy, and eggs, you’re probably feeling like you’ve finally got the healthy-eating thing figured out. Unfortunately, as good as you may feel while following a vegetarian or vegan diet, you won’t get enough of certain critical vitamins and minerals from eating plants alone. …

If you’ve hopped on the plant-based diet bandwagon and given up meat, dairy, and eggs, you’re probably feeling like you’ve finally got the healthy-eating thing figured out. Unfortunately, as good as you may feel while following a vegetarian or vegan diet, you won’t get enough of certain critical vitamins and minerals from eating plants alone. Two key supplements can go a long way toward filling those the gaps.

Vitamin B-12 and Iron

Some people on a strict vegan or vegetarian diet begin to feel foggy or sluggish, and there’s a reasonable explanation for it. According to Douglas Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., and co-founder of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, the small deficiencies brought on by plant-based eating can lead to bigger issues long-term.



“From a cognitive or brain function standpoint, if you have insufficient intake of B-12 and insufficient intake of iron, it affects the health of your nerves. It affects cognition,” he says.

Vitamins

Following a completely vegetarian or vegan diet eliminates the most prevalent sources of B-12 and iron, which are typically found in meat and dairy. While it may not be noticeable in the first few months of going plant-based, the effects over time can add up. As a sports nutritionist for a university, Kalman never neglects to quiz his athletes on their eating habits.

“I have 18 teams every season, every year, and I go through and ask, ‘All right, who’s a vegan? Who’s a vegetarian? Who’s a regular meat eater?’” he says. “That way, I know who needs a little bit of extra attention about how to pick foods.”

There’s nothing wrong with choosing to eat a vegetarian or vegan diet, and Kalman himself was a vegetarian for eight years. If you do decide to forgo meat and dairy, though, supplementing with B-12 and iron can help prevent deficiencies that can lead to mental sluggishness and low energy. Follow the labels for dosage and usage instructions.

If you’re a lifter or other athlete, Kalman recommends educating yourself before limiting certain types of foods, so you know exactly which supplements you may need to fill the gap.

To hear more on Kalman’s views on supplementation and athletic performance, listen to the Bodybuilding.com podcast Episode 43: Deep-Diving Sports Nutrition with Dr. Douglas Kalman, and for an in-depth education on what to eat to maximize your fitness goals, check out his educational program, Foundations of Fitness Nutrition.

The 2 Essential Supplements for a Plant-Based Diet was originally published at https://www.bodybuilding.com/content/the-2-essential-supplements-for-a-plant-based-diet.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=Social_content&utm_campaign=fb_articles&utm_content=fb_articles