July 27, 2020

Iris Kyle: The Road To 10 Ms. Olympia Titles And Becoming The Most Successful Female Bodybuilder Of All Time and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Iris Kyle: The Road To 10 Ms. Olympia Titles And Becoming The Most Successful Female Bodybuilder Of All Time, Four Bodybuilders Who Are Still Ripped Even Over 60 Years Old, Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique  and Incorporate Strength Training Gradually to Avoid Soreness and Injury. Hope you enjoy them…

Iris Kyle: The Road To 10 Ms. Olympia Titles And Becoming The Most Successful Female Bodybuilder Of All Time

When discussing the men’s side of bodybuilding, it is hard to narrow down the greatest of all time, between Ronnie Coleman, Phil Heath, and others. However for female bodybuilding, that spot is a lot easier to decide. With ten Ms. Olympia titles under her belt, Iris Kyle had done more than enough to cement her…

When discussing the men’s side of bodybuilding, it is hard to narrow down the greatest of all time, between Ronnie Coleman, Phil Heath, and others. However for female bodybuilding, that spot is a lot easier to decide. With ten Ms. Olympia titles under her belt, Iris Kyle had done more than enough to cement her place as the best to ever do it. But how did she get there?

Full Name: Iris Kyle
WeightHeightAgeDate of Birth
150-180lbs(68-82kg)5’7 (170 cm)45 yearsAugust 22, 1974
NationalityEra
American1990, 2000, 2010

Born in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Iris Kyle was the second youngest of six children. This led her to growing up with a naturally competitive streak, that bled over into her early athletic endeavors. Her high school career saw her play softball, cross country, and basketball, with the latter of which earning her All-American status.

This success as a basketball player led Kyle to a load of college scholarship opportunities. However she wound up attending Alcorn State University in Lorman, Mississippi. Here, she majored in business administration, while minoring in accounting, before moving to California, where her life would change forever.

Photo via Instagram @iriskyle

The Bodybuilding Career Of Iris Kyle

Iris Kyle did not begin being interested in bodybuilding until after she had moved to California. Being surrounded by tons of people who were fit and showed off their physiques led her to want to get into better shape herself. Therefore she made the decision to sign up for a gym membership, initially being overwhelmed by all the various pieces of equipment, but immediately feeling like she was in the right place.

Eventually as she began showing substantial results, Kyle was asked to work for the gym, where she started helping others as well. It was around this time that she discovered FLEX Magazine, and Muscle and Fitness, and fell in love with bodybuilding. In particular, she was drawn to the physique of Lenda Murray, hanging up her picture on the refrigerator, and wanting to shape her own body after the Ms. Olympia champ.

As things began to progress, Iris Kyle was approached by a local promoter, who asked if she wanted to compete at the 1994 Long Beach Muscle Classic, on 10 weeks notice. Agreeing to the contest, she came and won first place. Following this successful start to her amateur career, she started working with Patrick Lynn. The two would take a year from competition to work on her physique, before returning with a vengeance.

1996 and 1997 saw Iris competing five times, having some mixed results. Her best performances were a win at the 1996 NPC California, and a second place at the same year’s NPC USA Championships. Things really began to come together in 1998 though, when she was finally able to win the USA Championships, earning her Pro Card.

The first time Iris Kyle competed as a professional bodybuilder was at the 1999 IFBB Ms. International, where she placed a disappointing 15th place. She rebounded quickly though, earning second at the Pro World Championships. This left her with an invitation for her first ever Ms. Olympia event.

Iris Kyle 4
Photo via Instagram @iriskyle

Iris Kyle’s Legendary Ms. Olympia Run

First qualifying for the Ms. Olympia in 1999, Iris Kyle landed in the fourth place position. Fans were blown away with the muscular physique that she had shown, and that earned her a lot of favor in defeat. Unfortunately things would take a turn when she was disqualified from the 2000 Ms. International, for the use of diuretics. Then that year’s Olympia saw her in fifth place, not exactly living up to her full potential.

That would all change in 2001 though, as Iris would get her first professional win, at the Ms. Olympia. Yet she was unable to hold onto it for very long, coming in second to Lenda Murray, both in 2002 and 2003. She would pick the Ms. Olympia title back up in 2004, but lost it to Yaxeni Oriquen-Garcia in 2005. 

By 2006, Iris Kyle was forced to make a change to her physique. She got to work in the gym, fine tuning her body, before coming back at the 2006 Ms. International, getting the win that had eluded her for many years. Iris rode this momentum into the Ms. Olympia, getting her third victory, and starting an unbelievable run.

Starting from 2006, and continuing all the way through 2014, Iris Kyle would continuously alternate between winning the Ms. Olympia and the Ms. International. Year after year, she dominated the competition, with her only setback being an off performance at the 2008 Ms. International, where she placed 7th. Following her tenth Ms. Olympia victory, and seventeenth overall IFBB title in 2014, she would retire from bodybuilding, which would subsequently be the final year the Ms. Olympia was held.

That being said, it seems like both will be returning soon.

Photo via Instagram @iriskyle

Iris Kyle Competition History

1994

  • NPC Long Beach Muscle Classic – 1st
  • NPC Ironmaiden Championships – 2nd (MW)

1996

  • NPC Orange County Muscle Classic – 1st (HW and Overall)
  • NPC California – 1st (HW and Overall)
  • NPC USA Championships – 2nd

1997

  • NPC USA Championships – 3rd (HW)
  • NPC Nationals – 4th (HW)

1998

  • NPC USA Championships – 1st (HW and Overall)

1999

  • IFBB Ms. International – 15th
  • IFBB Pro World Championship – 2nd
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 4th

2000

  • IFBB Ms. International – 3rd (HW) (later disqualified)
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 5th (HW)

2001

  • IFBB Ms. International – 2nd (HW)
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st (HW)

2002

  • IFBB Ms. International – 2nd (HW)
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 2nd (HW)
  • IFBB GNC Show of Strength – 2nd (HW)

2003

  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 2nd (HW)

2004

  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st (HW and Overall)
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st (HW and Overall)

2005

  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 2nd

2006

  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2007

  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2008

  • IFBB Ms. International – 7th
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2009

  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2010

  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2011

  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st
  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2012

  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st
  • IFBB Ms. International – 1st

2013

  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st

2014

  • IFBB Ms. Olympia – 1st
Iris Kyle 7
Photo via Instagram @iriskyle

A Life Outside of Bodybuilding

While it is true that Iris Kyle holds the most consecutive Ms. Olympia wins of all time, she still somehow managed to have a life outside of the sport. In 2008 she would make an appearance on a special episode of Wipeout, but did not like the way she was treated while on the show. In addition to that, she made an appearance in Generation Iron 2.

As far as business ventures go, Kyle has been involved in training ever since she got the job back in the 90’s. Eventually she started her own nutritional line, Healthier by Choice, as well as promoting Visalus. In addition to that, she is the co-owner of a healthy cafe in Las Vegas, known as the Bodi Cafe. Nowadays, Iris finds herself working as a real estate agent.

Photo via Instagram @iriskyle

Iris Kyle’s Diet and Training

For the most part, Iris Kyle has kept the details of her diet and training rather close to the vest over the years. However it is known that she liked to work around four or five days a week, keeping a well rounded balance of what she works on. This has allowed her to bring the sculpted physique that she took to the stage for two decades.

This is Iris Kyle’s weekly training split:

  • Monday: Legs
  • Tuesday: Chest and Calves
  • Wednesday: Rest
  • Thursday: Back
  • Friday: Delts and Calves
  • Saturday: Arms
  • Sunday: Rest

Iris Kyle’s Back Routine

  • Front Pulldowns: 4 sets/10-12 reps
  • Low Cable Rows: 4 sets/10-12 reps
  • One-Arm Dumbbell Rows: 4 sets/10-12 reps
  • Deadlifts: 4 sets/15-10 reps
  • T-Bar Rows (optional): 4 sets/10-12 reps

As far as her diet is concerned, Kyle likes to keep her protein levels rather high, with copious amounts of chicken and turkey. In addition to that, she keeps things strict, rarely ever having a cheat meal. As far as supplements go, she kept things fairly minimal, mainly sticking to protein shakes and vitamins.

Iris Kyle 8
Photo via Instagram @iriskyle

What We Can Learn From Iris Kyle

The legacy of Iris Kyle is forever set in stone, just simply on the back of her accomplishments in the sport. However it was not something that came overnight for her. Not only did she have a slow start to her career, but even after she won the Ms. Olympia, she had to battle through setbacks. Her ability to overcome adversity demonstrated the championship mindset that she had throughout her career.

Although her career may not completely be finished yet, Kyle is the best female bodybuilder to ever grace the stage. She gets comparisons to the likes of Ronnie Coleman, but in all honesty her accomplishments even exceed that of the men’s legend. She is a true icon in the sport, and one of the best to ever do it, regardless of gender.

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Iris Kyle: The Road To 10 Ms. Olympia Titles And Becoming The Most Successful Female Bodybuilder Of All Time was originally published at https://fitnessvolt.com/iris-kyle/






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Four Bodybuilders Who Are Still Ripped Even Over 60 Years Old

As bodybuilders age, their bodies oftentimes begin to break down. However there are a select few athletes who can keep things up, and even thrive, well past their 60’s. Today we take a look at some of these genetic specimens, who are still in great shape. Let’s face it, even though bodybuilding is not a…

As bodybuilders age, their bodies oftentimes begin to break down. However there are a select few athletes who can keep things up, and even thrive, well past their 60’s. Today we take a look at some of these genetic specimens, who are still in great shape.

Let’s face it, even though bodybuilding is not a contact sport, it is extremely hard on your body. The older you get, the more difficult it is to push your body’s limits. The end result of a life of elite bodybuilding is usually more surgeries than you can count; just ask Ronnie Coleman.

That being said, there are some incredible men who have been able to defy the aging process. These bodybuilders have managed to stay in unbelievable shape, well into the middle age portion of their life. Today we take a look at these such athletes, and break down the best of the best.

4. Tony Pearson (Age: 63 years old)

Tony Pearson Bodybuilders
Photo via Instagram @tonypearson87

Former Mr. Universe winner Tony Pearson began his career among bodybuilders in 1976 as a teen competition. He would go on to win the aforementioned NABBA Mr. Universe title in 1980, and have several respectable performances at the sport’s biggest contests all the way until 1994. However he would shock the bodybuilding world when he came out of retirement in 2014, to compete at 57 years of age.

Tony Pearson
Photo via Instagram @tonypearson87

When he made that comeback, it was clear that Tony was in unbelievable shape, especially for his age. He says that his secret is just continuing to work out in the same ways he did during competition. Even still, he is rarely ever missing more than a day or two or working out every week.

3. Bill Grant (Age: 73 years old)

Bill Grant Bodybuilders
Photo via Instagram @billgrant.life

Earning the nickname the “Man of Steel,” Bill Grant was wildly successful in his prime. Starting weight training at nine years old, he was basically groomed to be one of the best bodybuilders in Earth. That is precisely what he was too, winning the Mr. World and Mr. International titles throughout his career that spanned 44 contests and over two decades.

Bill Grant
Photo via Instagram @billgrant.life

Even after his final bodybuilding show in 1994, Bill has managed to stay in unbelievable condition. Now, well into his 70’s Bill is one of the most jacked grandparents alive. His physique at 74 is enough to make some 24 year olds envious.

2. Robby Robinson (Age: 74 years old)

Robby Robinson Bodybuilders
Photo via Instagram @robbyrobinsonofficial

During the prime of his career, Robby Robinson was easily one of the best bodybuilders in world. This was made evident by his multiple wins at the Olympia, Mr. Universe, Mr. International, and Mr. World contests. The latter half of 1970’s was practically ruled by the Georgia native.

Robby Robinson
Photo via Instagram @robbyrobinsonofficial

Despite the fact that he has not competed since 2000, Robby has kept himself in impeccable shape. He credits this to the unique style of training he has, which is less strenuous on his muscles, resulting in fewer injuries over the years. Whatever it is, there can be no denying that it works for him, as he looks unbelievable for his age.

1. Vince Taylor (Age: 63 years old)

Vince Taylor
Photo via Instagram @vincetaylor50

There was once a time that Vince Taylor held the record for the most IFBB wins out of all the bodybuilders at that point. His 22 pro wins were eventually surpassed by the aforementioned legend Ronnie Coleman. However it is safe to say that Vince has been able to maintain his body a lot better than Ronnie, in his later years.

Vince Taylor
Photo via Instagram @vincetaylor50

While he spent the early years of his career lifting heavy, Taylor would change his approach in his 40’s. He began to realize how important it was to focus on conditioning and avoiding injuries, rather than adding mass. This switch has allowed him the longevity to win several titles in the Master’s division of the Olympia.

What do you think of our list? Were there any bodybuilders that we missed?

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Four Bodybuilders Who Are Still Ripped Even Over 60 Years Old was originally published at https://fitnessvolt.com/best-bodybuilders-over-60/







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Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique 

Most fighters are the epitome of a human body. Not only do they look incredible, with chiseled muscles, but they also perform on a world-class level. They have the strength and conditioning that some can only dream of, even for other athletes. When it comes to fighting, you can’t be all endurance or all strength,…

Most fighters are the epitome of a human body. Not only do they look incredible, with chiseled muscles, but they also perform on a world-class level. They have the strength and conditioning that some can only dream of, even for other athletes. When it comes to fighting, you can’t be all endurance or all strength, you have to be able to possess both strength and endurance in a perfect balancing act, or rather a dance, between the two. 

Eating Like a Fighter

The first thing you will have to do is change things up in the kitchen. In order for your muscles to show, you will have to lose the excess body fat and fighters go through the same regimen when cutting weight for a fight. It’s definitely much more involved in losing weight than just their training routine.

The only difference between fighters and the typical fitness junkie is that they treat it more simple rather than counting their macros and micros. For the most part, they eat about 5 fist-sized meals, or about 1,500-2,800 calories a day (depending on the weight class the fighter). As far as what they eat, its 70% whole foods, mostly vegetables  and lean proteins like fish and chicken. 

The Workout 

While boxers train about 6-8 hours a day, it doesn’t mean you have to. Instead, you want to focus on the exercises that are most efficient and borrow from their workout. 

 

Strength Training 

For strength, training boxers stick to calisthenics and very few lift weights. This is because bulky muscles will slow them down and require more oxygen. They have to have both lung and muscle endurance, so their strength training has to be endurance-focused, which means high reps calisthenics. 

Here is what you would do in a circuit. 

100-200 pushups 
50-100 Pullups 
100-200 squats 
100 Situps 
50 Leg Raises

Do this in a circuit with one-minute breaks, or one exercise to completion, followed by the next 

All these workouts have a strong focus on the core because fighters have to be strong in the body in order to have strong punches and to be able to take punches. For you, it will help you in all of your exercises by building explosiveness and giving you more muscle endurance. 

This workout will burn calories and build muscle. It’s a perfect mix of cardio and strength training.

Heavy Bag Workout

One of the most fun workouts that you will ever do is a heavy bag. This requires you to put on gloves and punching the bag for 3 minutes, 1-minute breaks, for 3 to 5 rounds depending on what you can take. This workout will help develop your core, your lats, your shoulders, and your endurance. You will most likely look like you went for a swim after four rounds because you will be drenched. 

Jumping Rope 

Many people scoff at jump roping as a kids exercise. When in reality it can burn way more calories than running per minute. It’s one of the most efficient fat burning exercises that you can partake in. Boxer’s do it because it’s an efficient way to cut weight, it works your shoulders and mostly calves like no other workout there is. Just ten minutes of rope jumping can burn well over 120 calories. 

Try it for a Month 

Nothing works if you don’t try it. Give this workout a shot for 30 days and see how you feel and watch your body change for the better. It will help you improve both in and out of the gym due to the extra endurance. Make sure to get your rest but go at least 5 days a week, in any format. Try it and let us know how your body has changed. 



Fighting Shape: How to Get A Fighter’s Fitness and Physique  was originally published at https://www.fitnessandpower.com/training/workout-routines/get-a-fighter-physique







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Incorporate Strength Training Gradually to Avoid Soreness and Injury

Runners spend a lot of time thinking about their legs and feet, but running is a full-body activity. “Running is a result of many muscles working together, it involves the arms, back muscles, core, hips, legs, feet and everything has to move synergistically, creating the right amount of force at the right time,” says Erika…

Runners spend a lot of time thinking about their legs and feet, but running is a full-body activity. “Running is a result of many muscles working together, it involves the arms, back muscles, core, hips, legs, feet and everything has to move synergistically, creating the right amount of force at the right time,” says Erika Canales, personal trainer and co-owner of Outright Fitness.

Strength training is an important part of a running routine because it helps the athlete to minimize injury, protect joints, and improve overall performance. But what is supposed to help runners prevent injury can also cause it when not approached properly. 

Avoid soreness and injury with warm-ups and cooldowns.

Experiencing some soreness is normal when you are starting a new workout routine and engaging muscles in a new way. Anything beyond mild soreness is not good. “If you are too sore to run, you probably did too much, too soon,” says Canales.

Just like with running, taking the time to warm up and cool down on weight training days will minimize soreness and reduce the risk of injury. “The warm-up and cooldown are as important as the strength training program itself,” says Canales. She recommends dynamic stretches (jogging, ground sweeps, walking leg sweeps, etc.) to help wake up the body and specific warm-ups dedicated to the area of the body you’ll be targeting in that session. 

“Your cooldown should look similar to the warm-up, using some dynamic stretching and even adding some static stretching,” she adds. 

Starting with lower weights in shorter training sessions—around 30 minutes—will also help your body ease into the new routine. If you do become very sore, Canales recommends that you continue to move by going for a walk, a short run, or doing more stretching. 

How often and how long should you strength train?

“As a beginner, you may want to start with 20-30 minute sessions multiple days a week,” says Canales. This will allow you to get used to the new movements and develop a routine that you’re comfortable with. Once that has been established, Canales recommends that runners progress to hour-long (or hour and a half) sessions two to three times a week.

If you don’t have time for a workout that long, “something is always better than nothing,” says Canales. Whatever you have time to fit in will benefit you more as a runner than skipping strength days all together. 

But don’t forget to consider how this all fits into your running schedule. Ideally, strength training should happen on low mileage days after the run or on an active recovery day. “The important part of planning your strength training days is making sure that you are recovered from your previous workout,” says Canales. This will help you avoid injury and underperforming. For example, it might be beneficial to save strength training for a day or two after a long run or focus on upper body workouts to allow your legs to recover. “The same recovery strategy applies when you have multiple strength training sessions during the week,” she adds. Just make sure you are focusing on different muscle groups each day. 

Should runners focus on body weight exercises or free weights?

Both can be beneficial to runners. Body weight exercises have the convenience that they can be done anywhere without equipment. You are also less likely to get injured starting out. Canales also recommends body weight exercises for light strength training days or heavy running days. 

“Free weights allow for more rapid progression in increasing strength,” she says. They become an external stressor that your body must adapt to and allow you to improve balance and coordination along with strength. And psychologically, you can benefit from seeing your progress laid out in front of you with the increased amount of weight you can lift. 

It can be very beneficial for runners just getting into strength training to consult a coach. Not only to help learn the proper form for various strength training moves, but also to develop a program that fits their abilities. It’s tempting to start going too hard and fast in a new program. A trainer will help you assess your baseline and get you started on the correct weights. 

“The benefits of strength training go beyond just improving athleticism,” says Canales. “It plays an important part in maintaining a good quality of life as we progress through every decade of our lives.” 

Ready to incorporate strength training into your routine? Give this total-body circuit a try.



Incorporate Strength Training Gradually to Avoid Soreness and Injury was originally published at http://ow.ly/7cZt50Ane3f