July 7, 2020

NYPD’s Most Jacked Cop Michael Counihan Talks With Simplyshredded.com and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on NYPD’s Most Jacked Cop Michael Counihan Talks With Simplyshredded.com, Bits about pushups, Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions due to COVID-19 and Your Brain on Exercise. Hope you enjoy them…

NYPD’s Most Jacked Cop Michael Counihan Talks With Simplyshredded.com

Quick Stats: Age: 32Height: 5’9″ – 175 cmWeight: 205 lbs – 93 kg Where does your motivation come from? Today my motivation has changed because I feel like I need to be in shape for my career. I also feel as if I have a small group of people that rely on me for motivation….

Quick Stats:

Age: 32
Height: 5’9″ – 175 cm
Weight: 205 lbs – 93 kg

How did you get started with bodybuilding?

Initially, my motivation for working out came from training for football at the age of twelve. Throughout college, I continued to have a passion for training.

At that time, I loved the way training made me feel, and I loved seeing my body change over time as it become stronger.

Where does your motivation come from?

Today my motivation has changed because I feel like I need to be in shape for my career. I also feel as if I have a small group of people that rely on me for motivation.

This in itself is motivation for me, as I don’t want to let those people down.

What do you love most about being a police officer in NYC, and do you feel your celebrity status has helped you while patrolling NYC?

I love being a cop, especially in NYC. And no, I wouldn’t consider myself a celebrity by any means. People very rarely recognize me on the street, but it’s gratifying when they do. It’s nice to know I motivate them to live a healthier lifestyle, and sometimes they even fill me in on what accomplishments they’ve made because I have inspired them.

News like that really helps keep me going!

Training Footage

What workout routine has worked best for you?

For me, hammering one body part at a time has worked best for me. Training this way also allows me to focus on bringing up any areas I feel may be lagging behind. Some conventional training methods have also helped me to achieve more overall muscle mass. For cardio, I do thirty minutes each day, and I prefer using the treadmill on an incline.

Full Routine:

Monday: Chest/Cardio

  • Incline Bench Press 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Flat Bench Dumbbell 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Incline Dumbbell Fly’s 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Incline Machine Press 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Cable Fly’s 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)

Tuesday: Back/Cardio

  • Lat Pulldowns 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Cable Rows 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Barbell Rows 15/12/10/8/6
  • Dumbbell Rows 15/12/10/8/8
  • Low Rows 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • T-Bar Rows 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Deadlifts 15/12/10/10/6/4/2
  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)

Wednesday: Quads/Hams

  • Squats 25/15/12/10/8/6
  • Wide Leg Press 5 x 15 (Superset)
  • Narrow Stance 5 x 15
  • Hack Squats 15/12/10/8
  • Lying Leg Curls 15/15/12/10/8
  • Leg Extensions 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Walking Lunges 4 x 15 (per leg)
  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)

Thursday: Shoulders

  • Dumbbell Shoulder Press 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Behind the Neck Military Barbell Press 15/15/12/10
  • Reverse Pec Deck Fly’s 15/15/12/10
  • Lateral Raises 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Wide Grip Upright Rows 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Front Raises 15/12/10/8
  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)

Friday: Arms/Cardio

  • EZ-Bar Curls 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Rope Pushdowns 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • Cable Curls 25/15/15/12/10
  • Skull Crushers 25/15/15/12/10
  • Straight Bar Curls 15/12/10/8
  • Close Grip Bench Press 15/12/10/8
  • Machine Curls 25/15/15/12/10/8
  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)

Saturday: Cardio/Abs

  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)
  • Crunches 3 x 25
  • Hanging Leg Raises 3 x 25

Sunday: Fasted Cardio/Abs

  • 30 Minutes Treadmill (Steady State)
  • Crunches 3 x 25
  • Hanging Leg Raises 3 x 25

If you had to pick only 3 exercises what would they be and why?

If I had to pick three exercises, they would probably be squat, bench and deadlift due to their overall value.

  1. Squats: I love doing squats for my overall core stability and leg mass.
  2. Bench: This is a great overall compound movement that not only works my chest, but it hits my triceps, shoulders and back.
  3. Deadlifts: In my opinion deadlifts are a true strength builder.

What is your diet like?

My nutrition solely depends on my desired physique, so it will vary from time to time. For example, if I’m trying to get leaner, I will manipulate my carbs and fats, and I will keep my protein levels relatively high. Currently, I am eating an unlimited quantity of vegetables during my meals, and I’m keeping my carbs at about 25-50 grams per serving. My diet at the moment looks something like below.

Daily Diet:

  • Meal 1: 1 scoop Protein
  • Meal 2: 6 Egg Whites and 1 Whole Egg
  • Meal 3: 6 ounces Chicken and 1 cup Vegetables
  • Meal 4: 6 ounces Lean Steak, 8 ounces Rice and 1 cup Vegetables
  • Meal 5: 1 scoop Protein and 50 grams Carb Powder
  • Meal 6: 6 ounces Chicken and 1 cup Vegetables

How does your training and diet evolve as you get closer to a competition or photoshoot?

My training really doesn’t change, but I do increase my cardio.

My diet changes leading up to a photoshoot usually by dropping the fats and carbs; then as the photoshoot draws near, I’ll increase the carbs.

What’s the one food you couldn’t live without, and do you have an occasional cheat meal?

I love pizza; it’s my go to cheat meal! (Laughs)

What is your supplementation like?

  • Protein
  • Pre Workout Stimulant
  • L-Arginine
  • Dextrose
  • Multivitamin
  • Fish Oil
  • Glucose

What do you love most about living in New York City? And what do you recommend is a ‘must see’ if someone comes for a visit?

One of the best parts about living in NYC is the endless amount of opportunities we have here.

For anyone visiting, I would highly recommend visiting the World Trade Center Memorial; it’s a ‘must see!’

Favorite Quote:

“They take you as seriously as you take yourself.”

Social Media:

Instagram – @nodonutshere
Facebook – Michael Counihan



NYPD’s Most Jacked Cop Michael Counihan Talks With Simplyshredded.com was originally published at http://simplyshredded.com/nypds-most-jacked-cop-michael-counihan-talks-with-simplyshredded-com.html






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Bits about pushups

Justin and I do pushups in almost every single class. Love them or hate them, you can’t deny how good the ol’ push up really is. Why you ask?? Well… as you lower your body to the floor and that familiar “burn” starts to kick in, I bet the last thing you’re thinking is “wow!…

Justin and I do pushups in almost every single class. Love them or hate them, you can’t deny how good the ol’ push up really is. Why you ask??

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Well… as you lower your body to the floor and that familiar “burn” starts to kick in, I bet the last thing you’re thinking is “wow! This is activating every single muscle in my body!” However, this is probably one of the top benefits of the push up. Major muscle groups like the biceps, triceps, stomach muscles, anterior deltoids and the lower body are activated to support your body while stabilizing your movements.

Classified a compound exercise (meaning multiple muscles are called upon), the most underrated benefits of doing pushups is the stretch it provides your biceps and back. As you lower yourself down, your back muscles are effectively stretched and when you push yourself back up, your arms get a full stretch as they extend. 

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And going back to it being a compound exercise, when you simultaneously engage large muscle groups, your heart must work harder to deliver oxygen-rich blood to muscle tissue. Ultimately, this activity results in an effective cardiovascular exercise which supports heart health and promotes the reduction of stored body fat. Not to mention: the pushup gives you a full body workout, helps create balance, stability and muscle density, you can do them anywhere, they burn calories, easy to modify, and the best part is… they are free!!

I could boggle your mind some more but I think you get the jist of why you need to do your pushups!!

J & I will do around 150 per day… how many do YOU do?!? 

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Bits about pushups was originally published at http://ricogroupfitness.net/new-blog/2018/9/6/bits-about-pushups







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Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions due to COVID-19

As professional sports look to make a phased return behind closed doors across much of Europe, researchers from the University of Bath caution that the prolonged individual training players have been exposed to for months is insufficient to help athletes maintain the physical fitness and mental strength they need for competition. Writing in the International…

As professional sports look to make a phased return behind closed doors across much of Europe, researchers from the University of Bath caution that the prolonged individual training players have been exposed to for months is insufficient to help athletes maintain the physical fitness and mental strength they need for competition.

Writing in the International Journal of Sports Medicine the researchers and sports physicians express their fears that injuries could increase once competitions resume and make recommendations for resuming training.

Most athletes are attempting to overcome the current coronavirus crisis by undertaking individual training within their own four walls to stay fit. But this might not be enough for those involved in contact sports, writes Professor Keith Stokes.

This is because, in addition to physical fitness, such sporting activities require training in evasive manoeuvres and contact situations. It is also near impossible to practice and hone the skills for game strategy when working alone. In addition, the researchers suggest, restrictions imposed on training and games also affects players’ morale, which negatively impacts their mental health.

In the paper the researchers draw parallels with what happened with American football in 2011. Then, the American National Football League had a 20-week lockout when clubs and players could not agree on payment. On returning to competition, injuries were more frequent, especially in the Achilles heel area.

Professor Keith Stokes from the University of Bath’s Department for Health and also England Rugby explains: “After months out of the game, without access to proper training facilities for much of that time, the return to playing matches must be carefully managed.

“Clubs must balance the need to prepare players for high levels of performance, the risk of injury after such a long lay-off, and the risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. The key will be to build appropriate progression into training to give players the safest and most effective possible return.”

In their paper the authors give practical advice on how athletes can protect themselves from injury once they resume sports activities suggesting that:

  • Athletes should work on their individual weaknesses during the period of training restriction.
  • Before return to full training a sports medical examination should be undertaken to inform training progression.
  • Athletes who had COVID-19 themselves should be very carefully managed. Strength and muscle mass might be impacted, but there are also potential impacts of the infection on the heart.
  • Reintroduction to training requires an individualised approach in these athletes.

In addition to their athletic abilities, players’ nutritional condition and mental health may suffer during training restrictions. These two aspects would therefore also have to be taken into account when planning the return to training and games. The authors recommend a high-protein diet, supplemented with vitamins D and C and probiotics as appropriate.

They also point out that forced, abrupt cessation of activity is often even more stressful for athletes than it is for other people. It is common for athletes to develop what is known as “detraining syndrome,” which is characterised by insomnia, anxiety and depression, can have a direct effect on their physical fitness and can delay their resumption of training.

Despite this, the authors are confident that most players will be able to play competitively again after a roughly six-week preparatory period. However, a great deal depends on how long the forced stop of competition has lasted and on what conditions training and games can resume.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Bath. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions due to COVID-19 was originally published at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200706113922.htm







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Your Brain on Exercise

40 and frumpy. Fat and fearful. That’s how NYU neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki describes her 1998 assistant-professor self, who went on a river-rafting trip in central Peru. “There was everyone from 16-year-olds to 60-year-olds, and I was the weakest link in the chain. After that, I said, ‘never again.’” Upon her return to New York, Suzuki…

40 and frumpy. Fat and fearful.

That’s how NYU neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki describes her 1998 assistant-professor self, who went on a river-rafting trip in central Peru. “There was everyone from 16-year-olds to 60-year-olds, and I was the weakest link in the chain. After that, I said, ‘never again.’”

Upon her return to New York, Suzuki started exercising regularly. To her surprise, not only did her body begin to change, but her work started to benefit as well. Her energy levels and mood improved, and her attention span skyrocketed. “My memory was also better than it had ever been,” Suzuki attests.

Being the neuroscientist that she was, this fascinated her and led to a complete paradigm shift in her career. Since then, she’s dedicated much of her research energy to exploring whether exercise can change the brain’s physiology and function.

Her answer is an emphatic “yes.” And here’s how:

Immediately.

Exercise is what Suzuki, who penned Healthy Brain, Happy Life (Dey Street, 2016), calls a “neurochemical bubble bath for your brain.” It ramps up dopamine and serotonin, which makes you feel good, and noradrenaline, which boosts your memory. It stimulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) growth-factor proteins, which help new brain cells form in the hippocampus.

Over Time.

Where you really see benefits is when you work out regularly for months and even years on end. “Exercise literally resculpts your brain,” Suzuki says. “Long-term, regular exercise, where each workout is boosting the level of BDNF, helps more and more of these new hippocampal cells to be born and integrate. That’s when you get bigger, fatter hippocampi.” The benefit? A more agile brain that is better poised to stave off dementia, remembers things better and, according to some preliminary studies, may even be more imaginative and creative.

According to Suzuki, midlevel aerobic exercise—vigorous enough to raise your heart rate—has been proven to provide these cognitive benefits. Other types of exercise—such as, resistance training, HIIT, yoga and more—haven’t been as well-researched. “It doesn’t necessarily mean they’re not as beneficial,” Suzuki says. “We just don’t have all the data yet.”

Suzuki’s latest endeavor, called BrainBody, is a tool she’s hoping will fill in some of those gaps by assessing people’s moods and cognitive responses right before and after they exercise. Over time, the information could help people in various demographics develop individualized workout plans that maximize brain benefits.

In the meantime, Suzuki’s recommendation is: Just get moving! “Find a way to move your body in a way you enjoy—that you will do regularly,” she says.

Your brain will thank you—now and for many years to come.



Your Brain on Exercise – Live Naturally Magazine was originally published at https://livenaturallymagazine.com/your-brain-on-exercise/