September 7, 2020

Ronnie Coleman: “It Was Never a Lifelong Dream of Mine To Be a Bodybuilder” and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Ronnie Coleman: “It Was Never a Lifelong Dream of Mine To Be a Bodybuilder”, 5 Ways to Make Your Desk a Healthier Place, Best Bodyweight Exercises to Train Forearms and Work Your Abs in Just 6 Minutes With This Workout From Celebrity Trainer Kira Stokes. Hope you enjoy them…

Ronnie Coleman: “It Was Never a Lifelong Dream of Mine To Be a Bodybuilder”

It has been a very rough few years for 8x Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman. After retirement, he had multiple back surgeries, and one point, there was a real possibility that he’d never walk again. But being the incredibly resilient and determined champion that he is, well, nothing has been able to stop him from training […]

It has been a very rough few years for 8x Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman. After retirement, he had multiple back surgeries, and one point, there was a real possibility that he’d never walk again. But being the incredibly resilient and determined champion that he is, well, nothing has been able to stop him from training even up until now (and he’s still walking). He may not be able to do the things that he used too, but he has been able to stay in shape and looks great.  

And if anyone knows a thing or two about overcoming challenges, it would be the man who was able to win the most prestigious title in bodybuilding a record eight times (tied with Lee Haney).

Ronnie Coleman Massive
Ronnie Coleman 

Coleman recently sat down with Brian Rose of the popular YouTube channel London Real where they discussed a wide range of topics. 

The interview started off with Coleman’s talking about his passion for bodybuilding as well as his experiences when he competed. 

Related: Ronnie Coleman Opens Up To Joe Rogan About Getting Insane 13 Surgeries Post-Bodybuilding

At one point in the interview, Brian talked about how he himself once trained with 6X Mr. Olympia Dorian Yates once, where he learned what it really takes to be a high-level competitor. Yates pushed Brian beyond what he thought he was capable of which no doubt gave him a new respect for competitors. 

He asked Coleman where his superior work ethic and training intensity comes from, and whether or not he goes to a dark place to channel those demons. 

Well according to Coleman, that wasn’t quite the case.

It’s not true with me. It’s just a desire to be the very best that I can. I’m like that with just about everything that I’ve ever done. I put every ounce of hard work and dedication into everything that I try to achieve. I feel like if you’re not doing it to be the best at it, you’re pretty much just wasting your time”.

He explained that he was born which that characteristic. 

Coleman was asked what advice he’d give to kids these days about how they should think about their priorities. Brian brought up the fact that a lot of people like to blame their lack of success on everything and everyone else rather than acknowledging the real reason/s for not succeeding. 

I think anybody that has anything has had to work extremely hard for it,” said Coleman. “Anything given to you is not really worth it. If you work hard and you make the sacrifices, it makes enjoying your success that much better for the most part.” 

Ronnie Coleman
Ronnie Coleman

Was there anything Ronnie Coleman regretted in his career? Well, maybe, if he didn’t win the biggest title in bodybuilding more than anyone in history. 

His response was, “Nothing at all because I use to tell people, I never in a million years would have thought that I’d win one Olympia, let alone eight“.

Coleman said that he wasn’t even expecting to win his first Olympia. In fact, he just got into it because it allowed him to train for free at his gym. 

It was never a lifelong dream of mine to be a bodybuilder”.

He never even though he was cut out to be a bodybuilder but boy was he wrong about that.

Regarding the amount of muscle that Ronnie Coleman had to gain during his journey, he explained that the most muscle he put on each year was about 5-6 pounds. It took Coleman roughly years to build his physique and become champion but with enough perseverance and patience, he made it happen. 

A lot of people are not real patient when it comes to packing on the pounds”. There’s a lot of truth to this. 

Another topic they touched on was the Dorian Yates era of bodybuilding where Yates completely dominated for years before his retirement in 1997 after his last win. Coleman came along and won the Olympia the very next year (1998). 

Coleman was essentially asked what he thought about Yates’s contribution to the sport. Yates was one of the first mass monsters that the sport had seen at the time. But he also brought the conditioning to the stage to match. 

He had the big muscles and the conditioning that nobody had ever brought to stage before. He was the first guy to ever do that,” said Coleman. 

But what could people look back and say about Coleman’s era?

I was trying to do the same thing Dorian was doing but on a higher weight scale. I got all the way up to 295 on stage with conditioning and stuff”.

Ronnie Coleman definitely introduced a new era of mass monsters, having improved every year and bringing more mass to stage. 

You can watch a portion of the interview below and there’s a link at the end of the video for the full interview.

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Ronnie Coleman: “It Was Never a Lifelong Dream of Mine To Be a Bodybuilder” was originally published at LINK






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5 Ways to Make Your Desk a Healthier Place

Lack of energy. Sitting all day staring at a computer. Slouching. Tight neck and back. Stress. Snacks calling your name. Sound a bit like your day at the office or home office? Not exactly the healthiest of situations, physically or psychologically. And all of that can take a toll on your body—tight hips and hamstrings […]

Lack of energy. Sitting all day staring at a computer. Slouching. Tight neck and back. Stress. Snacks calling your name. Sound a bit like your day at the office or home office? Not exactly the healthiest of situations, physically or psychologically. And all of that can take a toll on your body—tight hips and hamstrings from prolonged sitting, a disengaged and weak core, chronic dehydration, poor nutrition—that you’ll feel the ill effects of when you try to squeeze in a run.

You may not be able to control too much about your work environment, but you can make some changes at your own desk to lessen the burden. Here are some desk health strategies that can make a big difference:

Get aligned with a DIY ergonomic desk.

A recent ergonomic assessment conducted at the University of Cincinnati found that a large percentage of respondents were working in ill-aligned work stations. Over 40 percent had chairs at the wrong height, 18 percent had chairs with armrests adjusted improperly, 69 percent didn’t use the backrest of their chair, and over 50 percent had computer monitors set up at the wrong height.

The researchers recommend some quick fixes if you’re unable to go out and buy all new ergonomic desk equipment, like using pillows to adjust the height of your seat or elevating a laptop. Move your chair closer to the desk, so you’ll be more likely to use the back rest. Give your computer monitor a boost using a book or two so the top of the screen is at eye height. Add even more books or boxes to create a DIY standing desk.

Lose the chair for at least part of the day.

You may have heard that sitting is the new smoking, contributing to various medical conditions from blood clots to diabetes and joint problems. Even if you exercise every day, sitting for forty hours a week is hard on your body. “The body doesn’t like static postures continually,” says co-author of the University of Cincinnati ergonomic study, Kermit Davis.

Replace some of your sitting with standing or walking a bit while you work. Consider a buying or fashioning a standing desk or going low and kneeling at a coffee table. The researchers on the UC study point out that if you’re unable to put together the ideal ergonomic working space, rotating between ‘poor’ stations is the next best practice.

Or you can practice “active sitting” by utilizing an exercise ball or kneeling chair. Either can improve posture, balance, strength, and even reduce back pain, as it requires the constant engagement of core muscles. Make sure to introduce it in small increments (20 or so minutes at a time) so your body can get used to it and avoid overly fatiguing your muscles. There are even specially designed balance chairs for this purpose.

Other ideas: Pace while talking on the phone. Put the waste basket out of reach so you have to walk to it when you have trash. Go on walking meetings. Regularly increasing blood flow like this can help combat “sitting disease.”

Stretch and re-energize.

The UC researchers recommend taking a break from the desk and screen every 30 minutes to minimize injury to the back. It’s maybe one of the most crucial desk health practices you can implement.

Take a few minutes to work out the kinks and refresh your mind a bit. Take some deep, cleansing breaths and do some stretches at your desk. Tilt your head side to side to get a good neck stretch. Loosen and relax your jaw to prevent tension headaches. Try this shoulder stretch that does wonders before a run and also during a mid-day office break.

You’d be surprised at what a difference this can make.

Stash healthy snacks.

Make a plan for snacking, just like you’d meal prep for the week. Give yourself options that will enhance your health and boost your energy when you’re in that afternoon slump. Some good choices include trail mix, roasted chickpeas, homemade energy bars or bites, string cheese, greek yogurt, baby carrots, and fruit like bananas, apples or even fresh berries. Consider storing your snacks in a break room, lunch room, or kitchen instead of your desk drawer to give yourself another excuse to step away and to prevent mindless snacking.

Make water a desk health priority.

We all do it—get focused on the task at hand and forget about drinking. This can leave you dehydrated, listless, and dull by the end of the day. You’ll feel the affects of being dehydrated when you try to run, but, according to the Sleep Foundation, it can also disrupt your sleep and start the cycle of low energy, listlessness, and compromised performance all over again.

Combat this by deciding to drink a given amount by certain times, like finishing one 32-ounce water bottle before lunch and another before the day ends. If you want to get really fancy, there are smart water bottles that will connect to your phone and remind you to drink. Or apps, like Plant Nanny, that make tracking your water intake fun.



5 Ways to Make Your Desk a Healthier Place was originally published at LINK







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Best Bodyweight Exercises to Train Forearms

The chest, shoulders, quads, biceps, triceps—pretty much every muscle group—have overshadowed the Popeye-like forearms were once the primary goal of gym rats. Dudes and would do anything, including eating tons of spinach, to create them. That’s a shame too, since the forearms play a role in most every lift, to say nothing of the movements of everyday life. Why train […]

The chest, shoulders, quads, biceps, triceps—pretty much every muscle group—have overshadowed the Popeye-like forearms were once the primary goal of gym rats. Dudes and would do anything, including eating tons of spinach, to create them.

That’s a shame too, since the forearms play a role in most every lift, to say nothing of the movements of everyday life. Why train the forearms? For starters, you might want to improve the power in your swim, golf, or paddle stroke. You’ll definitely want to boost muscles that give your chest and arms a balanced, symmetrical look, especially when rolling up the sleeves on your long-sleeve shirt or sweater.

The forearms respond quickly to training, providing one of the better returns on investment of gym time. Best of all, you won’t need any equipment to train your forearms. You can use these 10 bodyweight movements as a warm-up, part of a regular workout, or as a standalone circuit. If you do a circuit, do two sets of 10.

Pete Williams is an N.A.S.M.-certified personal trainer and the author or co-author of a number of books on performance and training.



Best Bodyweight Exercises to Train Forearms was originally published at LINK







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Work Your Abs in Just 6 Minutes With This Workout From Celebrity Trainer Kira Stokes

One of the best things about doing compound exercises, or moves that recruit more than one muscle group at a time, is that you’re often working your abs and entire core without even realizing it. You don’t always have to feel your abs burning to be working them, which is great. But just like any […]

One of the best things about doing compound exercises, or moves that recruit more than one muscle group at a time, is that you’re often working your abs and entire core without even realizing it. You don’t always have to feel your abs burning to be working them, which is great. But just like any other muscle group, it’s nice to do some abs-focused work every once in a while.

Kira Stokes, celebrity trainer, group fitness instructor, and creator of the Kira Stokes Fit app, is a big proponent of what she calls “time under tension ab work.” That pretty much means an abs circuit that keeps the muscle group fully engaged the entire time. It’s the sort of workout that makes your midsection burn. “The abs are just as important a muscle group as any other muscle group in your body,” says Stokes. Since they make up a large portion of your core, they’re worth focusing on instead of being just an afterthought in your workout routine, maintains Stokes.

“All of your movement stems from your core—it’s the powerhouse of your body,” Stokes adds. “And your abdominals are a massive part of your core.” When we say abdominals, we aren’t just talking the rectus abdominis, which is the superficial muscle on top that you think of when you picture abs, but also include the transverse abdominis (a deep abdominal muscle that runs along your sides and spine) as well as the internal and external obliques (the muscles along the sides of your stomach).

Having strong abs muscles will help improve your performance in workouts and your ability to move throughout daily life, says Stokes. “Your abs support you in those heavier lifting movements you do: when you deadlift, squat, even when you’re doing a bent-over row. If you don’t have strong abs, you’re probably going to feel it in your lower back,” Stokes says. She also adds that if you’re focusing on your abs, you also need to make sure you’re doing an equal amount of work on the back of your body—your lower back and butt—to maintain symmetry and avoid any muscle imbalances that could impact your movement patterns and increase your risk of injury.

Working your abs in this “time under tension” fashion is a great way to really challenge the muscles in a short amount of time. All you really need, Stokes says, is a few minutes of nonstop work. Below, Stokes shares an abs circuit that takes only four to six minutes to do.

The Workout

What you’ll need: Stokes uses a hand towel in the circuit below. You can also use a small exercise ball, or if you don’t have anything on hand, you can do this without anything in your hands.

Moves:

  • V-up
  • Figure 8 Crunch
  • Hollow Hold to Knee Tuck
  • Butterfly Sit-up
  • Mountain Climber
  • Half Burpee Hop

Directions:

  • Do each exercise for 20 seconds.
  • Minimize rest in between each move.
  • Repeat the entire circuit two to three times.

Stokes encourages you to try your best not to release the contraction in your abs, and move quickly from one exercise to the next to increase the time your abs are under tension. (Of course, if you need a break, take one. A burning sensation in the muscles you’re working is a good thing, but if you feel strain or pain in your lower back, stop and take the time to refocus your form.)

As you get more comfortable with the exercises and start to feel stronger, slowly increase the time to 30 seconds for each move.

And a few quick notes on form: Make sure your lower back is anchored down on the floor whenever you’re lying on your back, Stoke says. When possible, squeeze your butt cheeks to keep them engaged—this is a good trick to keep your lower back on the ground, and will help you avoid straining it.

Here’s how to do each move:



Work Your Abs in Just 6 Minutes With This Workout From Celebrity Trainer Kira Stokes was originally published at LINK