August 31, 2020

THE BEST EXERCISES TO LOSE STOMACH FAT AT HOME FAST and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on THE BEST EXERCISES TO LOSE STOMACH FAT AT HOME FAST, Every ‘Fast & Furious’ Movie, Ranked Worst to Best, The Strength and Speed Workout and The Absolute Best and Worst Therapy Methods. Hope you enjoy them…

THE BEST EXERCISES TO LOSE STOMACH FAT AT HOME FAST

If you have troubles with belly fat and want to get rid of it, get ready to make a few lifestyle changes.If you are an overweight person, it would be difficult to accomplish this goal. But, if you are determined to get the perfect belly, you have to make sacrifices and say goodbye to the […]


If you have troubles with belly fat and want to get rid of it, get ready to make a few lifestyle changes.If you are an overweight person, it would be difficult to accomplish this goal. But, if you are determined to get the perfect belly, you have to make sacrifices and say goodbye to the sweet cupcakes, ice cream, burgers or pizzas. You need to focus on consuming only green leafy vegetables and foods rich in fiber. This is the only way you can reduce your waistline.

BEST FOOD TO REDUCE BELLY FAT

Lower your consumption of food that is rich in carbohydrate and increase fiber intake. This food will help you reduce your waistline:

Avocado
Avocados are great for reducing belly fat because of their high fiber content and monounsaturated fatty acids.

Apples
Replace carb-rich food with delicious apples. Consume this fruit three to four times daily.

Cucumber
Cucumber is a vegetable that includes low calories and high water content.

Almonds
Vitamin E and fiber are highly present in almonds, which will make you feel full and lower your hunger.

Watermelon
This delicious fruit has 80% water and very few calories. Watermelon helps you easily get the desired waistline.

Beans
Beans improve digestion and strengthen the muscles. It reduces your hunger and prevents you from overeating. Also, this vegetable helps in toning your belly.

Green leafy vegetables
Green leafy vegetables will prevent water retention and also, they include fiber and low calorie content.

DO EXERCISES
However, besides eating this food, it is also important to do some exercises to decrease the excess belly fat. Here is one video with excellent exercises for flat tummy:

ADDITIONAL TIPS TO AVOID STOMACH FAT

Always have water with yourself
It is very important your body to stay properly hydrated because it motivates the process of weight loss.

Stay away from junk food
Junk food is the main cause for fat in your body because it is rich in calories and fat.

Do not consume soda water
Avoid these waters because they have certain calories that support fat accumulation on the abdomen.

Do not starve yourself
If you starve yourself, it does not mean you help the process of losing fat. You only need to lower the calories intake

Keyword : lose stomach fat



THE BEST EXERCISES TO LOSE STOMACH FAT AT HOME FAST was originally published at LINK






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Every ‘Fast & Furious’ Movie, Ranked Worst to Best

Has there ever been a film series that turned into a bigger success story than the Fast and Furious franchise? It’s hard to beat. What started out as a low-stakes street racing crime film made on a $38 million budget has exploded into a massive, worldwide franchise generating over $5 billion, adding high-caliber stars like Dwayne […]

Has there ever been a film series that turned into a bigger success story than the Fast and Furious franchise? It’s hard to beat.

What started out as a low-stakes street racing crime film made on a $38 million budget has exploded into a massive, worldwide franchise generating over $5 billion, adding high-caliber stars like Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson and Jason Statham to a cast that already included Vin Diesel.

Those moves, along with the insane action and near-impossible stunts, have taken the action series to incredible heights, making it one of the most successful in all of Hollywood history. These summer blockbusters are nitrous-filled escapism for casual viewers, eye candy for the car enthusiast, and pack a moral punch that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Things have moved fast in the Furious franchise, and every movie after the first film in 2001 has gotten even bigger and more ridiculous, to the point where a submarine was part of a crazy action scene in 2017’s The Fate of the Furious. That was a recent addition to a long line of incredible stunts, including moments where a massive safe was dragged along the back of a vehicle during a high-speed chase and when a car was used by the characters to jump from skyscraper-to-skyscraper, hundreds of feet in the sky.

Now, the series is poised to get even bigger: The Rock and Jason Statham starred in the first Fast and Furious spinoff Hobbs & Shaw, which earned strong box office numbers in 2019, and coming up in the future are two more Fast and Furious sequels that will end the major storylines of the franchise.

Here’s a ranking of the eight major films in the main Fast and Furious franchise, from the humble beginnings to the crazy eighth installment. See how they stack up, according to our team:

Michael B Jordan Keanu Reeves And The Rock Promo Image For 30 Best Movies To Stream



Every ‘Fast & Furious’ Movie, Ranked Worst to Best was originally published at LINK







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The Strength and Speed Workout

If you’ve ever looked at the lineup of 100-meter sprinters during the Olympics or a high-level college meet, it looks as if any one of them could step on stage at a physique contest and notch a top placing. Elite sprinters have strong, capped delts, thick, striated arms and unbelievably well-defined abs, this in addition […]

If you’ve ever looked at the lineup of 100-meter sprinters during the Olympics or a high-level college meet, it looks as if any one of them could step on stage at a physique contest and notch a top placing. Elite sprinters have strong, capped delts, thick, striated arms and unbelievably well-defined abs, this in addition to their crazy quads and glutes. These guys don’t just run fast – they train for full-body power and strength, which helps them build lean, densely-muscled bodies.

Elite sprinters typically have very detailed training programs that involve a multitude of key lifts done for targeted percentages and low reps. But since you likely don’t ever need to break 10 seconds over 100 meters, you can just make some simple tweaks to your own training to start reaping some of the benefits of sprinter training. All you have to do is dedicate two days per week to your own program, which likely already involves (at least) 3-4 workouts per week. If you’re training more often, then simply insert these workouts into your split so that you’re training no more than five times per week in order to recover properly.

Incorporating these basic sprinter themes won’t get you to the starting blocks in 2016 but it will help you look like you should be there.

Power Hang 1

Strength Day. Elite sprinters are strong. Crazy strong. Many can hold their own with Olympic-level weightlifters because they focus on lifting heavy weight for low reps, as quickly as possible. This quick demonstration of power provides that out-of-the-blocks explosiveness it takes to shave hundredths of seconds off their best times over the course of a season. 

You’ll train the power clean first, when you’re fresh. For each five-rep set, you’ll use a weight that you can handle for about eight reps. The goal isn’t muscular failure – it’s picture perfect form on each violent but technically perfect rep. From there, you’ll move to the barbell squat, which emphasizes the glutes – critical for sprinters’ stride – while also strengthening the quads. The Romanian deadlift hits what is perhaps the most important muscle group for sprinters: the hamstrings. The RDL works the hamstrings from origin to insertion, improving sprint acceleration and deceleration and fortifying you against injury. Walking lunges are a strong, functional finisher that have tremendous carryover for nearly every athletic activity. Research shows that they are ideal for improving hamstring strength.

sprints

Speed Day. If you’re not a sprinter, chances are you are not a fan of running. Some of you out there no doubt have limitations that keep you from making running a bigger part of your program. The good news is that you don’t have to run timed, 200-meter intervals to get some of that sprinter aesthetic that you’re looking for. If you’re an M&F reader, chances are you’re already a fan of high-intensity intervals for cardio. HIIT preserves (or builds) muscle while burning more fat than steady-state cardio alone. By adopting a dedicated interval sprint day, you can create that uptick in fat-burning without sacrificing any of the muscle you’ve worked on building. All you’ll need is a GymBoss (www.gymboss.com or free in the app store) or a stopwatch, some room to run and 17 minutes.

Activity                                              Time

Sprint                                                 15 sec.

Walk                                                   45 sec.

–Repeat 15 times. Does not include a one-minute slow jog to warm-up or one-minute cooldown.

Perform a brief but thorough dynamic warm-up that gets blood flowing to all major muscle groups. You should have a light sweat and your legs, in particular, should be slightly pre-fatigued from a mix of bodyweight squats, skips, butt-kickers and jumping jacks. From there, you’ll stride into a light one-minute jog for a little specific warm-up. Then, it’s time to hit the gas. With each sprint, you should aim to reach your top speed as quickly as possible. At the end of each 15-second sprint, slow yourself gradually and walk for 45 seconds. By sprinting for 15 seconds, you allow yourself to take full advantage of phosphagen, the main source of fuel for brief, all-out activity, which has a shelf life of about 15-25 seconds. This sprint routine increases excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), helping you to burn more calories for the 24-72 hours that follow the workout. But this also helps you focus on something you probably haven’t in some time: getting faster. And you’ll be surprised at how your body responds when you make sprints a regular part of your routine.

Sprint Tips:

Whenever you think you have maxed out on your sprint, you will often find that you have “another gear.” Dig deep and run as fast as possible for the duration of the sprint.

If you run in the same place each week, make mental notes of your workout and strive to cover more ground in less time with each sprint.

Be active with your arms. Keep your arms bent at 90-degree angles, being careful not to cross your body with them as this will cause your torso to rotate, which bleeds speed. Keep them swinging hard but only forward and backward motion.

Speed is a product of stride length and frequency. Try to extend your stride out as far as you comfortably can while maintaining top speed.

Keep your abs tight but don’t flex them. This balancing act helps to stabilize your hips as you run, allowing your legs to move more efficiently. A slightly-braced midsection helps you maintain a strong running posture.



The Strength and Speed Workout was originally published at LINK







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The Absolute Best and Worst Therapy Methods

When it comes to injury, lifters and athletes will do just about anything to get back into the gym. They’re desperate to get under the bar again without feeling like a knife is being driven deep into their sciatic nerve. Shoulder, lower back, and knee injuries are reaching epidemiologic levels. But not all therapy and […]

When it comes to injury, lifters and athletes will do just about anything to get back into the gym. They’re desperate to get under the bar again without feeling like a knife is being driven deep into their sciatic nerve.

Shoulder, lower back, and knee injuries are reaching epidemiologic levels. But not all therapy and rehabilitation are equal. There are gold standard methods and practitioners that can return you to the iron and reduce your likelihood of reinjury, but there also are fluffy methods and non-lifting healthcare professionals who will waste your time and money.

If you’re hurt, know which therapy methods to prioritize and which ones to avoid even if they “feel good” at the time. And please, go out of your way to find a rehab pro that actually knows a thing or two about training, and maybe even looks like he lifts.

Disclaimer: The following videos are for demonstration purposes only. If you don’t have a license to practice these techniques, well, don’t!

The Best

1 – Active Release Techniques (ART)

When it comes to chronic and overuse soft-tissue injuries, you’d be hard pressed to find a technique that’s as acutely detailed as Active Release Techniques. This is true in both the physical diagnostic process and the actual treatment.

Developed by Dr. Michael Leahy, ART has been around for decades and became mainstream in sports and fitness simply because of the results people get from it. What is it? A hands-on technique placing tension over soft tissues – including muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and nerves – and moving those structures from a shortened position to an actively lengthened and stretched position under manual tension.

There are over 500 unique protocols for nearly every structure in the body, which provides the opportunity to break through rehab plateaus, especially if you find a truly talented and experienced practitioner.

For beat-up meatheads with postural imbalances and soft-tissues that resemble Jack’s Links beef jerky instead of supple and functional units of anatomy, investing in regular ART treatment is one of the most powerful things you can do to not only get over a nagging injury, but prevent future injuries as well.

2 – Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization

The use of a tool to assist in the manipulation of soft tissues is nothing new. It’s been around for thousands of years dating back to the traditional Chinese medical gua sha technique that involved scraping the skin with a beveled rock to elicit blood flow and healing to injured areas. You might’ve seen the gruesome purple bruising that this tool has become notorious for. Lucky for us, instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) has come a long way.

Claims of “breaking down scar tissue” aside (it’s very unlikely that’s happening), IASTM provides a very powerful neurologic response to tonic musculature and fascial sheaths, aiding in the improvement of mobility and function in the process when paired with movement remediation and exercise therapy.

The skin is a very responsive tissue neurologically and doesn’t get enough credit in the functional pyramid of importance. It has the ability to direct change in tone and function to the underlying structures below, and it’s the easiest bodily organ to access.

Caution: If your practitioner aimlessly and painfully bruises your tissues and tells you not to worry about it, go see another professional that actually knows what they’re doing.

3 – Functional Dry Needling

Just the mention of dry needling will have the acupuncturists filling up my inbox with troll mail. But you know what? No one profession owns a technique or tool, so enough with the butt-hurt.

Dry needling is a general term for therapeutic treatment involving multiple advances of a filament needle, which goes into a muscle producing pain and typically containing a trigger point. And no, dry needling is not a type of acupuncture; acupuncture is actually a type of dry needling.

Dry needling is one of the most progressive types of physical therapy treatment methods in the industry today. Nearly every state board allows physical therapists to practice dry needling in the evaluation, assessment, and treatment of patients with neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction or pain.

Movement experts now have access to another tool in the toolbox that’ll help clients recover. Is dry needling the be-all end-all of physical therapy? Absolutely not, but giving experts another way to help people isn’t a bad thing.

4 – Blood Flow Restriction Training

Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) training has made its way through the fitness industry, especially within the bodybuilding community. But since muscle form and function is essentially the same no matter what the intended use, BFR mechanisms of strength and muscle growth started to catch the eye of rehab practitioners with those same goals for their patients.

By occluding a muscular region with wraps, bands, or cuffs at approximately a 7/10 perceived level of tightness, muscular resistance training can be carried out using fractions of external loads, as low as 20-40% of a predicted 1RM. Then higher set and rep ranges would create a highly metabolic environment perfect for increasing muscle growth and strength.

The most exciting aspect of BFR is the ability to build muscle tissue in lagging regions while minimizing the joint stress and shear forces that are most commonly involved with maximally loaded exercises. Doing work with less weight means joint stress is greatly decreased, while metabolic stress of the local environment is maximized.

It’s killing two birds with one big ass stone, and it’s why I prioritize this method not only for the rehab of pain and dysfunction, but also for performance training and aesthetic programming i.e. working out to look good naked.

5 – Spinal Manipulation

Some may wince at the inclusion of spinal manipulation, but hear me out. When used intelligently, as a part of a holistic, movement-based rehab plan, the novelty of a “spinal adjustment” may be one of the most powerful ways to reset a painful or dysfunctional tissue or region.

It’s true, chiropractors are specialists when it comes to manipulating the spine, but they’re not the only rehab pros with the ability to crack backs. In most states in America, other healthcare pros including physical therapists have the education, knowledge, and skillset to “mobilize” the spine using higher velocity forces.

So don’t seek out rehab practitioners based on the type of license they hold, but instead find one with multiple tools in their therapy arsenal. Find one who can tailor their treatment for you and your needs, rather than arbitrarily using a specialty they’ve become biased towards. Above all else, make sure your guy knows training, appreciates the powerful effect of movement, and actually has a movement practice of his or her own.

The Worst

1 – Massage

Massage has its place in recovery, but it’s limited when it comes to treating pain and dysfunction. Why? Because movement needs to be assessed and injury needs to be diagnosed. This is one of the most important aspects of successful rehabilitation. It’s what gets you back to training and prevents future injuries from occurring.

Licensed massage therapists don’t diagnose musculoskeletal or neurological dysfunction, so it’s limited in its carryover to producing results if you’re truly injured. That said, it’s possible to randomly and unpredictably receive therapeutic benefit from massage when injured. If you rub up on enough musculature, something is eventually bound to happen. But you’d rather have a sniper remediate a functional weak link than drop a bomb on Hiroshima.

What are massages best for? Systemic recovery. Save them for times when you need to expedite overall recuperation. If you’re hurt, go see a licensed healthcare practitioner with the ability to properly diagnose your exact problem.

2 – Cupping

Cupping

Similar to IASTM and dry needling, the practice of cupping has made its way to our Western medical model, especially here in North America. But different from needling and tooled soft tissue manipulation, cupping isn’t quite as effective. Why would a practitioner use this method when so many other more notable techniques have proven themselves effective?

By placing cups on the skin and drawing the underlying skin up into the cup by means of air or heat decompression, the technique is thought to drive local blood flow into the area to aid in the healing process.

This method has begun to die off here in America, again due to having many superior alternatives to remediate similar dysfunctions, but I’ve seen it stick around in some clinical settings due to one reason: the ability for the therapist to bill insurance for “manual therapy” which can actually receive a higher amount of reimbursement.

Manual therapy should involve a more highly elevated skill set than placing cups and pumping up a tissue with a glorified penis pump. And if gaming a faulty medical system seems to be the only reason this method is used, start looking for a rehab professional who will place your care above their financial bottom line.

Related:
More on Blood Flow Restriction Training

Related:
The Tendonitis Cure



The Absolute Best and Worst Therapy Methods was originally published at LINK