July 26, 2020

The Best Free-Weights Workout Plan To Build Strength and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on The Best Free-Weights Workout Plan To Build Strength, What’s Healthier: Fried Rice Vs. Lo Mein, The 12 Best Glute Exercises For Mass and How to Re-Energize Your Running Game. Hope you enjoy them…

The Best Free-Weights Workout Plan To Build Strength

It’s not essential to use free weights in your training to bulk up and burn fat, but if you use them in the right way, it’s fair to say dumbbells, kettlebells and the barbell can make building muscle easier. However, it does have to be in the right way. It’s easy to overestimate your abilities…

It’s not essential to use free weights in your training to bulk up and burn fat, but if you use them in the right way, it’s fair to say dumbbells, kettlebells and the barbell can make building muscle easier. However, it does have to be in the right way. It’s easy to overestimate your abilities when selecting the weight for your workouts – and it’s always better to get the form right with a lighter weight, or even no weight at all, than get pulled out of shape straining to lift a weight you’re not ready for.

The training plan below is a great way to get to grips with free weights. You’ll work with a barbell as well as dumbbells and kettlebells to challenge muscles all over your body, using foundational compound exercises like squats, lunges and deadlifts, as well as targeting specific muscle groups with isolated moves like biceps curls.

Over the four weeks of the plan you’ll focus on movement patterns, rather than hitting certain muscle groups with your workouts. The first training session is built around pushing exercises, working the chest, quads, shoulders and triceps. Then in the second workout, you’ll do pulling moves, hitting your back, hamstrings and biceps. In the final workout, all the exercises involve rotating your body or resisting rotation.

By training in this way you’ll build all-over functional strength, becoming stronger and leaner in a way that brings benefits to everyday life and when playing sports, as well as improving your performance in the gym.

How To Do These Workouts

Follow the sets, reps and rest instructions for each move to get the maximum benefit. Do each workout once a week for four weeks, aiming to increase the amount you lift each week – and make sure you note how much you lift in each session to track your progress and keep yourself motivated.

How To Warm Up For These Workouts

When you’re working with heavy free weights it’s vital to warm up before you start your session. Not only will you reduce your risk of injury, but you’ll also ensure you’re ready to excel from your first rep onwards, rather than struggling with your first few sets while your body gets accustomed to the idea you’re working out.

A warm-up doesn’t have to take more than five to ten minutes, but it does have to be linked to the workout you’re about to do, so don’t just jump on the treadmill and then assume you’re ready to lift heavy weights.

Start with this dynamic stretching routine to get your muscles moving, and then move on to some workout-specific exercises. With the workouts below, the simplest way to do this is to run through a round of the exercises you’re going to do, using very light weights or no weights at all. That way you’ll know for sure you’re working the exact muscles you’re about to test.

When it comes to preparing for bodyweight exercises like diamond press-ups, you can do a shortened set during your warm-up round or opt for an easier variation like press-ups with your knees grounded. Remember you’re just aiming to get the muscles firing, not exhaust yourself before the workout proper begins.

Workout 1: Push

1 Dumbbell bench press

Sets 3 Reps 10 Rest 60sec

Why The week kicks off with a double header of everyone’s favourite move – the bench press. You start with the dumbbell version because you’ll go a bit lighter than with a barbell, and it’s better for warming up your shoulders because you have to work harder to stabilise the joint.

How Lie on a bench with your feet on the floor directly underneath your knees, holding the dumbbells above your chest. Lower them to your chest, then drive your feet hard into the floor and push the dumbbells back strongly to the start position.

2 Incline bench press

Sets 4 Reps 6 Rest 60-90sec

Why The incline version of the move puts a slightly different emphasis on your muscles, working the front shoulders a bit more than the flat version does. You’ll probably find you can’t lift quite as much weight because of this.

How Lie on a bench set at a 45˚ incline, holding a bar over your chest with your hands just wider than shoulder-width apart. Lower the bar until it’s touching your chest, then press it back up.

3 Back squat

Sets 5 Time 5 Rest 90sec

Why The king of the legs moves works your entire lower body and, when you go really heavy, turns into a whole-body move as your entire upper body is recruited to control your torso and prevent your body from slumping. It’s a really useful, functional exercise so, if your mobility permits it, you’d be wise to make it a cornerstone of your training programme.

How Rest the bar on your back with your feet roughly shoulder-width apart, toes pointing out slightly. Keep your spine in alignment by looking at a spot on the floor about two metres in front of you, then sit back and down as if you were aiming for a chair. Lower until your hip crease is below your knee. As you drive back up, keep your weight on your heels.

4 Overhead press

Sets 4 Reps 6-8 Rest 60sec

Why Lifting a heavy weight overhead will work your entire shoulder joint and will also improve your core and abdominal strength because those muscles need to be switched on to stabilise your spine.

How With your feet shoulder-width apart, hold a bar on your upper chest, hands just wider than shoulder-width apart. Brace your abs, glutes and quads as you press the bar straight upwards. Pause at the top, then lower. You may find wrapping your thumbs around the same side as your fingers allows you to lift more weight.

5 Diamond press-up

Sets 4 Reps 6 Rest 60-90sec

Why This is a deceptively tough exercise. Moving your hands close together to form a diamond shape will put a lot more emphasis on your triceps. Don’t be surprise if you struggle to hit the rep count if you’re new to this exercise – just focus on maintaining good form.

How Get into a press-up position, placing your hands close together so your thumbs and index fingers touch. Keeping your body in a straight line with your abs braced, lower your torso until your chest is just above the floor, then press back up.

Workout 2: Pull

1 Snatch-grip deadlift

Sets 3 Reps 10 Rest 60sec

Why Any form of deadlift is an excellent full-body exercise that focuses on the posterior chain (the muscles on the back of your body). We’ve gone for the snatch-grip version because the wider grip forces you to reduce the weight and you therefore won’t use up too much energy early in the workout. The next two moves are quite taxing so you want to keep a bit of energy in the tank.

How Hold a barbell with your hands roughly double shoulder-width apart. Push through your heels and keep your chest up as you drive forwards with your hips to lift the bar.

2 Romanian deadlift

Sets 5 Reps 5 Rest 60-90sec

Why Like the previous move, this develops your glutes and hamstrings, areas that most men would benefit from strengthening. The movement is essentially a hip hinge and has a huge positive carry-over to everyday activity.

How Stand tall with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell with an overhand grip just outside your thighs. With a slight bend in your knees, bend forwards from the hips and lower the bar down the front of your shins until you feel a good stretch in your hamstrings. Push your hips forwards to reverse the move to the start.

3 Bent-over row

Sets 5 Reps 5 Rest 60-90sec

Why By now your grip should be getting a bit fried but hang on in there for this first-class back-builder. Having a strong back will improve your posture, which will allow you to lift heavy weights safely and also reduce your chances of injury.

How Hold the bar with a shoulder-width grip, bending your knees slightly. Bend at the hips until your torso is at roughly a 45˚ angle to the floor. Pull the bar up to touch your sternum and then lower under control. If you’re moving your upper body to shift the bar, the weight’s too heavy.

4 Biceps curl

Sets 3 Reps 10 Rest 60-90sec

Why You’ve done all of the worthy work. Now it’s time for a bit of guns glory. Don’t be tempted to go too heavy. – pick a weight that allows you to complete the reps with a slow eccentric (lowering) phase. And hey presto, you’ll be bursting out of your T-shirt in no time.

How Stand tall with your shoulders back and feet close together, holding a pair of dumbbells with palms facing forwards and hands just outside your hips. Keeping your elbows tucked in to your sides, curl the dumbbells up towards your chest, stopping just before your forearms reach vertical. Lower under control to return to the start position.

Workout 3: Rotation

1 Kettlebell walking lunge

Sets 3 Reps 10 each side Rest 60sec

Why The lunge is an excellent exercise and this version is useful because it increases the co-ordination and stability challenge. You spend a significant amount of time on one leg so your body has to fight the force that are pulling it off balance and out of alignment.

How Start by standing upright with a dumbbell in each hand with plenty of space in front of you. Take a big stride forwards and simultaneously bend both knees until your rear knee is just above the floor. Ensure that your front knee is in line with your front foot and that your knee doesn’t travel in front of your mid-foot. Push through your front foot to stand upright then bring your back leg through to lunge forwards with that leg. Continue that pattern for the duration of the set.

2 Kettlebell windmill

Sets 2 Reps 8 each side Rest 60-90sec

Why This impressive-looking move is one of the most effective abs exercises you can do. It’ll also test your hamstring flexibility and shoulder stability, and it’s vital to concentrate during the entire rep. It’s a tough and technical move but if you persevere and put in the work you’ll be well rewarded.

How Press the kettlebell overhead, then lean your torso forwards and to one side so that your free hand travels down your leg. Keep your arm and back straight throughout. Turn your head at the bottom of the move so you can check that the kettlebell’s directly overhead. Reverse the movement to return to the top position.

3 Russian twist

Sets 3 Reps 10 each side Rest 60sec

Why This is a much simpler side abs move than the windmill so we’re introducing it into the workout once you have already been fatigued. The key to getting this right is slowing it down, really controlling the movement and focusing the tension on your abdominals.

How Sit on the floor with your torso at a 45° angle to the floor and your knees bent. Hold a kettlebell by the handle with both hands then rotate to one side. Return to the middle and rotate to the other side, then return to the middle again to complete one rep. Once you can complete the reps with relative ease, raise your heels a few centimetres off the floor to increase the abs challenge.

4 Kettlebell Turkish get-up

Sets 3 Reps 5 each side Rest 60sec

Why This isn’t something you see the average person doing in a high-street gym, but it has wide-ranging benefits. Each rep involves about 20 seconds of continuous work so it’ll get your heart rate up. It’ll also build full-body strength and enhance your co-ordination and proprioception (your body’s ability to sense and react to its own position).

How Lie on your back with a kettlebell in one hand. Roll slightly away from it as you press it upwards, coming up to support yourself on your opposite forearm. From here, plant the foot on the same side as the kettlebell on the floor, and use it to take your weight as you sweep your other leg underneath you into a half-kneeling position. Stand up with the kettlebell overhead. Reverse the whole movement to go back to the floor.



The Best Free-Weights Workout Plan To Build Strength was originally published at https://www.coachmag.co.uk/fitness/workouts/free-weight-workouts






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What’s Healthier: Fried Rice Vs. Lo Mein

You train hard, and occasionally you like to reward yourself with Chinese takeout. (We said occasionally.) But you don’t want to abandon all discipline and end up feeling like the love child of Jabba the Hutt and Fat Bastard. So what’s the healthier order, fried rice or lo mein? Short answer: lo mein. Yes, both…

You train hard, and occasionally you like to reward yourself with Chinese takeout. (We said occasionally.) But you don’t want to abandon all discipline and end up feeling like the love child of Jabba the Hutt and Fat Bastard. So what’s the healthier order, fried rice or lo mein? Short answer: lo mein. Yes, both dishes usually come slathered in sauce, but the rice offers the unfortunate double-whammy of being fried in oil first. “You can’t make fried rice better unless you make it on your own,” says Jennifer Agustines, a Tampa-based registered dietitian. “If you want rice at a restaurant, your best bet is to get an entrée like chicken and broccoli and steamed rice on the side.”

Lo mein, meanwhile, is typically made with egg noodles, which are a better option than traditional white pasta thanks to an extra protein boost from the yolk. Its downside is the sky-high sodium from the soy sauce that the noodles
 are swimming in, but that’s an easy problem to solve. “Ask for the sauce on the side so you control the amount you put on,” advises Agustines, who also suggests getting a version laced with a protein like shrimp or chicken and asking for extra veggies thrown in. “Customizing it is always a smart move.”

Serving size: One order at P.F. Chang’s 

Stats of Fried Rice

  • 960 calories
  • 24g protein 
  • 23g sugar
  • 164g carbs 
  • 22g fat

Stats of Lo Mein 

  • 640 calories
  • 21g protein 
  • 26g sugar 
  • 116g carbs 
  • 10g fat

And the winner is…Lo Mein 



What’s Healthier: Fried Rice Vs. Lo Mein was originally published at https://bit.ly/2CMNxNt







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The 12 Best Glute Exercises For Mass

We live in an ass-less society. Despite the rise of the booty girls on Instagram, a large and growing number of the population – both male and female – is lacking in the butt department. Flat, shapeless glutes are becoming the norm, and a lot of people who’ve got bigger butts are just fat and…

We live in an ass-less society. Despite the rise of the booty girls on Instagram, a large and growing number of the population – both male and female – is lacking in the butt department. Flat, shapeless glutes are becoming the norm, and a lot of people who’ve got bigger butts are just fat and soft.

Why are good glutes in such short supply? It’s probably because we now spend the majority of our time sat on chairs. This not only completely unloads your butt; it also places it in a stretched position.

The combination of inactivity and a stretched position causes hypotonicity. This means the glutes lose their firmness or tone as it’s properly called.

The good news is that, with some time, effort, and dedication, you can wake up your glutes and restore them to their former, firm, and powerful glory.

Glute Anatomy 

Glutes is usually short for gluteus maximus. However, there are other muscles that make up the glute complex that are no less important.

Providing you use the best glute exercises, you should have no problem building a muscular butt. Still, it’s always useful to know a little about the underlying anatomy of the muscles you want to develop.

And don’t for a moment underestimate the importance of the glutes. They are biomechanically similar to your deltoids or shoulder muscles. In fact, some people call them the deltoids of the hip.

Glute Anatomy
Glute Anatomy

The muscles that make up the glutes complex are:

Gluteus maximus

This is the muscle you are currently sat on, but it’s more than just somewhere convenient to sit! The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the human body and also potentially the most powerful. Located on the back and side of your hip, the functions of the gluteus maximus are:

  • Hip extension
  • Hip lateral (external) rotation
  • Hip abduction (superior or upper portion)
  • Hip adduction (inferior or lower portion)

Gluteus medius

The gluteus medius is located above and beneath the gluteus maximus near the iliac crest of the pelvis. It works alongside gluteus maximus and also has some additional functions.

  • Hip abduction (movement away from midline of body)
  • Hip medial (internal) rotation
  • Pelvis stabilization

Gluteus minimus

This is a small triangle-shaped muscle located within the posterior aspect of the hip. Like the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus also works alongside the gluteus maximus, and its functions are:

  • Hip abduction
  • Hip medial rotation
  • Pelvis stabilization

Tensor fascia latae

Meaning white tissue, the TFL is part of the glute complex despite not having the word gluteus in its name. It’s a biaxial muscle which means it crosses two joints – the hip and the knee. As part of the glute group, TFL is involved in:

  • Hip internal rotation
  • Hip abduction
  • Pelvis stabilization

Gluteus maximus might be the most prominent muscle in the glute complex, but the other muscles deserve your attention too. They might not contribute much to butt mass, but they are critical for hip stability and performance.

If these other, smaller muscles are neglected, your hips won’t be as stable, and that will affect your athletic performance. Because of the complexity of this part of your body, you must train your glutes from several different directions to ensure you include all of these muscles.

The 12 Best Glute Exercises for Mass

Don’t waste your time on second-rate exercises. Instead, build your best glutes ever with the best exercises! Include at least a few of these 12 exercises in your lower body workouts to sculpt the ultimate butt.

1- Barbell back squat

The barbell back squat is often thought of as a quadriceps exercise. While that is definitely the case, it’s also a great glute mass exercise too. Make it even more so by wearing a booty band around your knees the next time you do squats.  

Barbell back squat
Barbell back squat

How to do it:

  1. Rest and hold a barbell across your upper back. Step out and into a shoulder-width stance, with your feet turned slightly outward. If using a booty band, make sure you push your knees outward against the material. Brace your abs and lift your chest.
  2. Push your hips back, bend your knees, and descend until your thighs are roughly parallel to the floor. Do not round your lower back. Make sure you keep your weight on your heels.
  3. Stand back up and repeat.

Benefits:

  • A very functional exercise
  • A great total lower body move
  • Useful for building muscle mass and strength

2- Romanian deadlifts

Romanian deadlifts exercise provides your glutes with a good stretch and also works your hamstrings and lower back. It’s a strong exercise that lends itself well to lifting heavy weights, which is what makes it a superior mass builder.

The Romanian Deadlift
Romanian deadlifts

How to do it:

  1. Hold a barbell with an overhand, shoulder-width grip in front of your thighs. Stand with your feet about hip-width apart, knees slightly bent but rigid.
  2. Push your butt back, hinge forward from your hips, and lower the weight down the front of your legs as far as you can without rounding your lower back.
  3. Squeeze your glutes, drive your hips forward, and stand up straight.
  4. This exercise can also be performed using dumbbells.

Benefits:

  • A useful exercise for increasing conventional deadlift performance
  • Works not only the glutes but the entire posterior chain
  • An excellent upper back and forearm exercise too

3- Single leg Romanian deadlift

We could have just added this exercise as a post script to #3, but it’s such a good glute move that it deserves its own mention. Using one leg, this exercise not only works gluteus maximus, but medius, minimus, and TFL too.

Single Leg Romanian Deadlifts
Single Leg Romanian Deadlifts

How to do it:

  1. Hold a dumbbell in each hand or a kettlebell in both. Stand with your feet together, knees slightly bent but rigid. Shift your weight over onto one leg.
  2. Hinge from your hips and lean forward, lowering the weight(s) down the front of your leg as far as you can without rounding your lower back. Extend your non-working leg out behind you for balance.
  3. Stand back up and repeat.
  4. Do the same number of reps on each leg.

Benefits:

  • Less low back stress than regular Romanian deadlifts
  • Good for developing your balance
  • An excellent exercise for athletes

4- Hip thrusts with raised shoulders

While you can do hip thrusts lying on the floor, it’s a much more effective exercise when done with raised shoulders. Why? Because it increases your range of motion, and that increases the difficulty of this exercise.

How to do it:

  1. Sit on the floor, so your upper back is resting against a sturdy exercise bench. Bend your legs and place your feet flat. Rest and hold a barbell across your hips.
  2. Contract your glutes and push your hips up toward the ceiling. At the top of the rep, your knees, hips, and shoulders should form a straight line.
  3. Lower your butt back down to the floor and repeat.
  4. No weights? No problem! Just do this exercising with one leg to make up for any lack of resistance.
  5. Add a booty band to make this exercise more glute-centric

Benefits:

  • Minimal low back stress
  • Produces an intense contraction at the top of each rep
  • Can be done with or without weights

5- Bulgarian split squat

This is another exercise that is often thought of as “just” a thigh exercise when, in actuality, it’s a great glute move too. Using one leg at a time, it’s ideal for training gluteus minimus, medius, and TFL, as well as glute max.

How to do it:

  1. Stand with your back to a knee-high exercise bench. Bend one leg and place the top of your foot on the bench behind you. Hop forward and into a split stance.
  2. Bend your legs and lower your rear knee down to within an inch or so of the floor. Lean forward slightly from your hips to maximize glute activation.
  3. Stand back up and repeat.
  4. Do the same number of reps on each leg.
  5. Hold dumbbells by your sides, a barbell across your upper back, or a kettlebell in front of your chest to make this exercise harder.
  6. You can also do this move with your rear foot in a suspension trainer.

Benefits:

  • An excellent exercise for improving balance
  • Good for hip mobility
  • A useful exercise for athletes, and especially runners

6- Good mornings

Good mornings are a somewhat controversial exercise because some trainers think they are bad for your lower back. If you round your lower back, this move could definitely cause injury but, done right, it’s not really much riskier than Romanian deadlifts.

Barbell Good Mornings
Barbell Good Mornings (Image via @mattmunsonrealtor)

How to do it:

  1. Rest and hold a barbell across your upper back as though you were going to do squats. Stand with your feet about hip-width apart. Bend your knees slightly, but then keep them rigid. Brace your core and lift your chest.
  2. Hinge from your hips and bend forward as far as you can without rounding your lower back. Feel a deep stretch in your hamstrings.
  3. Stand back up and repeat.
  4. You can also do this exercise with the bar in the crook of your elbows – a Zercher good morning.

Benefits:

  • Useful for developing a powerful hip hinge
  • An effective strength and muscle mass exercise
  • Very little grip strength required

7- Total hip machine hip extensions

With no weights in your hands or on your back, this exercise is a stress-free way to build glute mass. You can also adjust the range of motion to suit your flexibility. Most gyms have a total hip machine.

How to do it:

  1. Adjust the lever arm so that the leg pad is about hip height. Standing side on to the machine, lift and place the crook of your knee over the leg pad. Bend your supporting leg slightly for balance and grab the handles.
  2. Drive your thigh down and back against the resistance offered by the machine. Extend your hip fully but without hyperextending your lower back.
  3. Return to the starting position and repeat.
  4. Do the same number of reps on each leg.

Benefits:

  • No spinal compression
  • A functional, full-range exercise
  • An excellent way to ensure both sides are trained equally

8- Double bench hip thrust

This exercise is the plus-sized version of #4. Raising your shoulders and your hips significantly increases the range of motion, making this one of the most effective hip extension glute mass exercises around.

How to do it:

  1. Set up for the shoulder raised hip thrust but, this time, also place your feet on a similar height platform. Only your butt should be resting on the floor.
  2. Drive down through your feet and lift your hips up into the air until they are fully extended. Take care not to hyperextend your spine.
  3. Lower your butt back down to the floor and repeat.
  4. Make this exercise harder by resting and holding a weight on your hips or using just one leg.

Benefits:

  • Minimal lower back strain
  • Can be done with or without weights
  • Suitable for home exercisers

9- Clamshells against a wall

This exercise involves nothing but external hip rotation, which means it emphasizes the gluteus minimus and medius. If you have problems with your knees falling in when you squat, lunge or run, this exercise could be the solution.

How to do it:

  1. Lie on your side with your back against a wall. Bend your legs and place your feet flat against the wall too. Rest your head on your outstretched arm.
  2. Without moving your pelvis, open your legs and lift your uppermost knee up and out toward the wall. Your range of motion will depend on your flexibility.
  3. Lower your leg and repeat.
  4. Try to do the same number of reps on each leg.
  5. This exercise can also be done without the wall, but you’ll have to really focus on keeping your hips square.

Benefits:

  • No lower back stress
  • A good exercise for hip stability
  • A prehab-rehab exercise for getting your glutes firing properly

10- Reverse Hyperextensions

Most hip extension exercises involve lifting your upper body. This can, in some cases, put a lot of stress on your lower back. With reverse hyperextensions, your upper body remains stationary while your legs move. This is easier on your lower back but still provides an effective glute workout.

Reverse Hyperextension Muscles Worked
Reverse Hyperextension Muscles Worked

How to do it:

  1. Lie face down on a hyperextension bench. Your hips should be on the edge of the bench, in line with the pivot point. Attach the loading strap to your ankles and grab the handles.
  2. With your knees slightly bent, extend your hips and lift your legs up behind you until they are roughly parallel to the floor.
  3. Lower your legs and repeat.
  4. Adjust the weight to match your current level of strength.

Benefits:

  • Minimal lower back stress
  • Works the glutes and hamstrings together
  • Can also be done using a bench and a stability ball if required

11- Side-lying hip abductions with a booty band

This exercise emphasizes gluteus minimus and medius, which are located on the side of your hip. It’s a bit of an aerobics class classic, but that doesn’t mean it’s not useful for building outer glute mass, especially when done with a booty band.

How to do it:

  1. Lie on your side with your legs straight. Loop a booty band around your ankles, or just above or just below your knee. The closer the band is to your feet, the harder this exercise becomes. Lie down flat and rest your head on your outstretched arm.
  2. Without rolling your hips back, lift your uppermost leg up and out to the side to about 45-degrees of hip abduction, or as far as your booty band allows.
  3. Lower your leg and repeat.
  4. You can also do this exercise without a booty band or while wearing ankle weights.

Benefits:

  • Easy on your lower back
  • An effective way to emphasize gluteus minimus and medius
  • Helps fire up the glutes before more complex exercises, e.g., squats

12- Deficit Reverse Lunge

Lunges are a great glute exercise. Working one leg at a time, they increase gluteus minimus and medius activation as these muscles have to work hard to keep your hips stable. Add an increased range of motion by using a step, and you’ve got a really useful glute mass exercise.

How to do it:

  1. Stand on a stable step with your feet together. Use a step that’s between 4-12 inches high.
  2. Step back and place your rear foot on the floor behind you. Bend your legs and lower your rear knee down toward the floor as far as your flexibility allows. It should drop below the level of your front foot. Lean forward slightly from your hips to increase the stretch on your glutes.
  3. Step forward and up back onto the platform.
  4. Either do another rep with the same leg or swap sides and alternate as preferred.
  5. Make this exercise harder by holding dumbbells or using a barbell.

Benefits:

  • Good for developing balance and coordination
  • A very effective total leg exercise
  • Easier on your knees than forward lunges

Important Glute Training Tips

Get more from your glute training with these crucial and helpful workout tips.

Don’t overemphasize hip extension

 Hip extension IS an important glute function, but it’s one of several movements that your glutes are responsible for. To develop your glutes to their fullest, make sure you include exercises that involve hip abduction and lateral rotation as well as extension.

In some cases, all three of these movements can be combined into one exercise, for example, by wearing a booty band during hip thrusts and squats.

Use a full range of motion

Some glute exercises involve a very short range of motion, often just the last 45 degrees of hip extension. While these exercises aren’t entirely useless, they are not as useful as those that involve a much bigger range of motion. Choose at least a few exercises that involve moving from full hip flexion to hip extension to work your glutes through their entire range of motion.

This is better for muscular development and developing functional strength, not to mention maintaining or improving flexibility.

Use a broad rep range

Your glutes are made up of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscle fibers. Fast-twitch fibers respond best to heavy weights and low reps. In contrast, slow-twitch fibers are more aerobic in nature and do better with lighter weights and higher reps.

To maximize glute complex development, make sure you include low rep/heavy weight and higher rep/lower weight training in your workouts.

Watch your lower back

Many of the best glute exercises for mass also involve the lower back. In most cases, the lower back has to act as a stabilizer to prevent unwanted movement of the spine.

Rounding your lower back could lead to injury, so make sure you avoid doing so. Instead, make sure you hinge from your hips instead of moving your back. Not only will this reduce your risk of injury, but it will also make your chosen exercise more effective.

Don’t forget to include some single leg exercises

One of the most effective ways to activate and strengthen your gluteus minimus, medius, and TFL, is to stand and move on one leg. These small but no less important muscles will then have to work extra hard to stabilize your pelvis. If you want to increase hip stability, make sure you include some unilateral exercises in your glute mass workout.

Wrapping Up

Your glutes are one of the most important muscles in your body. Not only do they give your rear an attractive shape, but they are also involved in almost every human movement. From getting out a chair to climbing stairs to walking, running, and jumping, your glutes are the engine that drives you forward and upward.

Your glutes are also crucial for the health of your lower back. When lifting heavy objects off the floor, if your glutes are weak, your back ends up bearing more of the load, and that’s a recipe for injury.

Say “no” to weak, soft, small glutes! Add some mass to your ass with these tried and tested exercises.

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The 12 Best Glute Exercises For Mass was originally published at https://fitnessvolt.com/best-glute-exercises/







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How to Re-Energize Your Running Game

Without a doubt, the best and most reliable cardio workout is running or jogging, either on a treadmill or in the great outdoors. And during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, when many gyms and fitness centers are still closed indefinitely, running is about the only exercise people can do right now (well, except the lucky ones…

Without a doubt, the best and most reliable cardio workout is running or jogging, either on a treadmill or in the great outdoors. And during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, when many gyms and fitness centers are still closed indefinitely, running is about the only exercise people can do right now (well, except the lucky ones with home gyms).

Even the most avid runners will admit, though, that it can get boring and repetitive, and getting your daily steps in can seem like a chore rather than a joy some days. But it doesn’t have to be like this.

With the weather finally warming up in most areas, this is the perfect time to start running. Not to mention the fact that there are countless benefits, from reducing your risk of heart disease to improving your memory.

So we reached out to a few running experts to find out how to put some pep in your step and actually look forward to tightening your laces, plugging in your headphones, and hitting the trails.

No matter if you’re an experienced runner, a newcomer, or someone looking for a reason to start running, these tips can help you break the monotony and make your runs more fulfilling and exciting.



How to Re-Energize Your Running Game was originally published at https://bit.ly/2ApPMVD