July 10, 2020

Your first marathon training plan and More…

In today’s Body Shapr Digest we bring you articles on Your first marathon training plan, Bodybuilding Champion Josef Grolmus Found Dead At Age 59, Mobility Rx Workout 2 and Here’s Why COVID-19 Can Spread So Easily at Gyms and Fitness Classes. Hope you enjoy them…

Your first marathon training plan

Training lingo explained… Your training plan is made up of four different types of run: Long runLong runs are exactly what the name suggests; they’re the longest run of your week. Your long run will build in distance as your training progresses to help your body and mind prepare for running 26.2 miles. Easy runMany…

Training lingo explained…

Your training plan is made up of four different types of run:

Long run
Long runs are exactly what the name suggests; they’re the longest run of your week. Your long run will build in distance as your training progresses to help your body and mind prepare for running 26.2 miles.

Easy run
Many runners go too fast on their easy runs. To get the full benefits, it’s important to slow right down to as much as a minute per mile slower than you plan to run on race day.

Intervals
There are many benefits to interval training. It can help you get faster, improve running efficiency and build mental resilience. Make sure you don’t go too fast – you don’t need to go at your top speed to get these benefits. And it’s important you’re properly warmed up before doing your interval sessions.

Tempo run
You’ll be practicing running at your goal pace for race day, as well as doing some quicker tempo runs to build your fitness.

It’s also good to do some cross training (swimming, cycling or gym classes) and some strength training (core exercises like planks or lower-body exercises like squats) alongside your runs.

Your first marathon training plan was originally published at https://www.womensrunning.co.uk/training/your-first-marathon-training-plan/

Bodybuilding Champion Josef Grolmus Found Dead At Age 59

Some heartbreaking news has torn through the bodybuilding community this week, as another veteran of the sport has died at an early age. German bodybuilding champ Josef Grolmus has tragically passed away at just 59 years old. Competing from 1982-1990, Josef did not have the longest career in the sport. Nevertheless that short span saw…

Some heartbreaking news has torn through the bodybuilding community this week, as another veteran of the sport has died at an early age. German bodybuilding champ Josef Grolmus has tragically passed away at just 59 years old.

Competing from 1982-1990, Josef did not have the longest career in the sport. Nevertheless that short span saw some pretty incredible performances, with him competing at the Olympia on two different occasions. Although he did not win, he scored 10th place in 1986, and 15th in 1987, showing that he had what it takes to be on stage with the best.

Unfortunately, it seems that Josef Grolmus has sadly passed away. Reports emerged suggesting that the German athlete was found dead in his home, with no cause of death determined at this time. This was then backed up by a post to the IFBB Facebook page, where they shared messages of mourning.

“In MEMORIAM: JOSEF GROLMUS

Is it with deep sadness that we must report the passing away of the former World Champion and Slovak Bodybuilding legend, Josef “Gigant” Grolmus; on July 13th, at the age of 59 y.o.

Involved in Bodybuilding since he was a teenager, Grolmus was competing from 1977 until 1990, with great international results as the IFBB World Title in 1985, at the Light-Heavyweight category and European Title in 1984 and 1990, in his last international participation.

During his almost 14 years of Bodybuilding career, Grolmus also competed as a professional athlete between 1986 and 1989, being one of the most representative European athletes of that period and inspiring the new generations of Bodybuilding with his multiple appearances in magazines.

The IFBB joins his family and friends, in their sorrow and prayers.

Rest in peace.”

IN MEMORIAM: JOSEF GROLMUSIs it with deep sadness that we must report the passing away of the former World Champion…

Posted by IFBB on Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Despite the fact that Grolmus never quite reached the pinnacle of the sport, he was still a well-respected figure in bodybuilding. His career saw him victorious at the IFBB World Amateur Championships, earning his Pro Card. After things began to slip in his results, he would return to the amateur level to end his career, with his last contest being a first-place win at the 1990 European Amateur Championships.

FitnessVolt would like to send their deepest condolences to the friends and family of Josef Grolmus. He will certainly be missed.

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Bodybuilding Champion Josef Grolmus Found Dead At Age 59 – Fitness Volt was originally published at https://fitnessvolt.com/josef-grolmus-dead/

Mobility Rx Workout 2

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Mobility Rx Workout 2 was originally published at https://www.marklauren.com/blog/workouts/mobility-rx-workout-2/

Here’s Why COVID-19 Can Spread So Easily at Gyms and Fitness Classes

People are antsy to get back to their normal exercise routines, but many are left wondering how risky going to a gym is right now. Researchers from South Korea recently warned people against rigorously exercising in confined spaces like fitness studios. Moist, warm air combined with turbulent air flow from exercising may create an environment…

 

  • People are antsy to get back to their normal exercise routines, but many are left wondering how risky going to a gym is right now.
  • Researchers from South Korea recently warned people against rigorously exercising in confined spaces like fitness studios.
  • Moist, warm air combined with turbulent air flow from exercising may create an environment in which virus droplets can spread readily.

All data and statistics are based on publicly available data at the time of publication. Some information may be out of date.

For the past few months, people have been working out inside their homes. Bedrooms became yoga studios, offices doubled as cycling spaces.

But now, as states reopen, some gyms and fitness studios are welcoming customers again.

People are antsy to get back to their normal exercise routines, but many are left wondering how risky going to a gym is right now.

Health experts say the key to protecting yourself comes down to four things: masking, physical distancing, handwashing — and whenever possible, taking your workout outdoors.

Here’s what to know if you’re thinking about going back to the gym.

 

One of the main concerns health experts have about COVID-19 is how readily it can spread through the air via respiratory droplets, especially in confined spaces.

Researchers from South Korea recently warned people against rigorously exercising in confined spaces like fitness studios.

For an early release report published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Korean researchers looked at a confirmed case of COVID-19 and eventually traced consecutive confirmed cases back to a nationwide fitness dance class.

Ultimately, the research team found 112 COVID-19 cases linked to dance workout classes across 12 different facilities.

According to the researchers, the moist, warm air combined with turbulent air flow from exercising may create an environment in which droplets can spread readily.

“Based on recent research, aerosolized droplets can remain airborne for up to 3 hours, making the potential for spread in crowded and confined spaces such as fitness studios problematic,” said Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency medicine physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

The size and intensity of the class can also impact transmission.

According to the study, transmission was detected in fitness classes that were about 50 minutes long, were held in a studio measuring around 645 square feet, and included anywhere from 5 to 22 people.

People breathe harder when they work out, which is the prime way the virus spreads from person to person.

“When people breathe more rapidly and more deeply, they expel greater numbers of droplets,” Glatter said.

Keep in mind that even if people who have COVID-19 don’t have symptoms, they can still spread the disease.

Dr. Anne Liu, infectious disease physician with Stanford Health Care, said people are most infectious the day before, day of, and a couple of days after developing symptoms. They can even transmit the virus several days before symptoms appear, Liu noted.

If a person is asymptomatic or presymptomatic, they can expel viral particles into the air through droplets that can become aerosolized, according to Glatter.

“This increases the potential of transmission among people in hot and crowded fitness studios with poor air circulation,” Glatter said.

 

 

The most effective solution is to take your workout outside, according to Liu.

Gyms with access to outdoor space should consider hosting fitness classes outside, Liu said.

The risk for contracting the coronavirus outdoors is lower than contracting it inside because coronavirus particles can disperse more quickly outside.

When working out outside, people should still stay 6 feet away from others, bring their own equipment, and limit the number of people in the group.

Remember, just because you’re outside doesn’t mean you can’t get sick — it just means you have a lower chance of being exposed to viruses in the air.

 

 

If your heart is set on going to the gym, make a plan.

Liu said everyone has to grade their own risk.

Look at local transmission in your area (more outbreaks could mean you have a higher risk) and what local health authorities are saying about community spread.

Consider your own underlying health conditions and age, and whether it’s safe for you to be in confined spaces with others.

“Each person needs to really assess their own risk, and then assess the risk of that situation to determine whether that level of risk is acceptable to themselves,” Liu said.

At the gym, practice good hand hygiene, bring your own equipment when possible, and disinfect any communal weights or mats you may use.

You may also want to consider wearing a mask while exercising.

Though this can be tricky with high intensity workouts, masking will ultimately help us share space again, according to Liu.

Physical distancing can cut your risk of developing COVID-19, too.

Until there’s a readily available vaccine, we shouldn’t let our guards down at the gym just yet.

 

People are antsy to get back to their normal exercise routines, but many are wondering how risky going to a gym is right now.

Early evidence shows COVID-19 can spread readily in confined spaces where people are rigorously working out. The safest thing to do is take your workout outdoors.

If your heart is set on the gym, it’s crucial to look at community spread in your area and your own risk factors. When in doubt, wear a mask while exercising if possible, practice physical distancing, and keep washing your hands.

 

Here’s Why COVID-19 Can Spread So Easily at Gyms and Fitness Classes was originally published at https://www.healthline.com/health-news/heres-why-covid-19-can-spread-so-easily-at-gyms-and-fitness-classes